Basement insulation w/ existing tar paper and studs

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I recently pulled off old wood paneling in my basement, and would like to insulate it using rigid foam (silverboard or durofoam). Behind the panelling, there is tar paper, and 1x2" studs approximately every 1.5 feet. I see the tar paper as extra protection/moisture barrier, and am inclined to install the rigid foam over top. I have gotten such a range of advice on this...

Option 1) keep tar and studs, fasten rigid board on top leaving a 1-inch air gap between the wall and foam - and build a frame in front of foam for drywall.

Option 2) remove tar paper and all studs, adhere foam directly to cement wall and build out from there.

Option 3) remove studs, adhere foam to tar paper directly.

Option 4) cut foam to fit between existing studs and use tuck tape and expandable foam to fill in spots.

Does anyone have experience with this type of situation? The home is 65 years old, and we live in zone 6 for weather. Spray foam is not an option for us. Thank...

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I've spent HOURS and HOURS on the Internet (actually days and days) investigating basement insulation techniques. If you don't agree with my method below, please take the following advice: DO NOT USE A VAPOR BARRIER on EITHER SIDE OF THE basement wall. I don't care what anyone advises. I've had builders recommend vapor barriers -----------------and I'm sorry to say, they may build a great house above the ground, they don't know what they are talking about when it comes to basements!!!!

I wouldn't insulate my NEXT basement this way, but this is what I did in 2006, one year after my NEW house was built. Seven years later my basement is dry and the walls are dry. (I use a dehumidifier in the warmer months as a precaution.)

1/2 inch blue extruded polystyrene styrofoam (R-5) glued top to bottom of basement wall vertically and directly to walls with FOAMBOARD adhesive. Why 1/2 inch? It was on sale for a great price-----$8 per sheet in 2006. Sealed joints with housewrap tape....
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Steps

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Determine whether you are qualified to install basement insulation yourself. If not, contact a local contractor through the Insulation Contractors Association of America (ICAA) or ask friends and family that could recommend a trusted contractor.

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Determine the R-value of the insulation to be installed.

R-value represents the thermal resistance of the insulation.

Guidelines and recommendations can be found through the International Energy Conservation Code. For the United States, most insulation falls somewhere between R-5 and R-10.

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Measure intended space for insulation.

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Purchase blanket insulation according to measurements.This insulation is made of flexible fibers ranging from fiberglass to natural fibers such as sheep's wool. It comes in either batts or rolls. Use unfaced blanket insulation if your insulation is going over existing insulation.

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Choose blanket insulation with or...

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Basement insulation installed incorrectly is one of the most common Contractor errors I see on a regular. Often times the results are disastrous with severe mold and mildew problems, not to mention the loss of heating bill savings that mounts up over time.

For years contractors have been treating basements much like regular living space. It’s not uncommon to see fiberglass basement insulation in direct contact with foundation walls. Typically here in the Northeast I see several methods including:

Plastic vapor barrier against concrete wall, fiberglass insulation inside stud wall, then drywall. Fiberglass insulation inside a “bag” hanging from the rim joist down along the foundation wall. Stud wall filled with fiberglass insulation an inch or two away from the concrete wall.

This may seem like an obvious problem but the fact that I see contractors still using fiberglass insulation in basements leads me to believe that the industry needs to do a...

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Here at GBAGreenBuildingAdvisor.com, we regularly receive questions from readers about the best way to insulate a basement wall. Since these questions pop up frequently, it’s time to pull together as much information as possible on this topic.

In this article, I’ll try to explain everything you always wanted to know about insulating basement walls.

Is it worth insulating a basement wall?

If you live in Climate Zone 3 or anywhere colder, it’s cost-effective and wise to install basement wall insulation. This advice applies to those who live in most of New Mexico and most of Alabama, as well as all of Oklahoma, Arkansas, and South Carolina, and anywhere colder than these states. (Click here to see a climate zone map.)

Canadian researchers who studied basement insulation methods and costs in five Canadian locations (Toronto, Ottawa, Halifax, Edmonton and Victoria) concluded that “for all types and sizes of basements assessed in this study, the lowest total...

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I'm trying to decide on the best approach to insulating a basement wall. I'm currently contemplating the following:

Option #1: Use 2 inch polystyrene foam insulation directly against the exterior walls and tuct tape it to seal it. Erect my 2x4 stud walls against this and drywall. Also, I could potentially insulate between the 2x4 walls with regular bat insulation to increase my R value.

Option #2; The old way, as defined by a contractor I spoke with. Lay out tar paper against the exterior walls. Erect my 2x4 stud walls against this. Fill the voids with bat insulation and vapour barrier the wall. Put up the drywall.

The first one obviously appears to be the warmer but is it more overkill ? I'm a little concerned about the loss of real-estate due to the added wall thickness but the extra heat & potential energy savings do sound appealing.

thanks,


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Failing to properly insulate your home can send your energy bill sky high, but the best time to do it is before you finish the walls. When you're living in a home with exterior insulation that leaves something to be desired, your best option -- short of uncovering the walls -- is to blow insulation into them. The procedure involves making holes in the walls, either from inside or outside the house, but they are usually easy to hide.

Types of Loose-Fill Insulation

Just as they make fiberglass batt insulation, manufacturers also make loose-fill insulation from fiberglass. While it has a good insulation value and resists mold and moisture, it can produce floating particles in the air that are dangerous to breathe unless contained in special netting inside the wall. Cellulose, made from recycled materials like newspaper and cardboard and treated with fire-resistant chemicals, is a greener alternative. It is heavier than fiberglass, however, so to prevent it from clumping...

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