Bumped into a joist while drilling for a toggle bolt

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Getting a smaller toggle with shorter wings will likely get the wings to release, but you still need to shorten the toggle's bolt. With your toggle on the bolt & screwed down to where the closed toggle wings are a little further from the bolt's head than the thickness of the drywall...you want some slack.

Snap or cut (with wire cutters or pliers bending the offending bolt section back & forth) the bolt's length down to the toggle or slightly above of course. Then, also double the drywall hole diameter, nothing close to the hook base's diameter though.

This will allow you to just tilt the toggle away from or outside of the joist to let the toggle wings flare out. Once the wings are out then you can pull the bolt back down under the joist & screw the 1/4" or so right into the joist. I've had very little trouble getting that thin bolt screwed into a joist, even a full inch, those hooks are a pretty good...

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There are several ways to install toggle bolts in your ceiling. The major factor is the amount of weight you plan on hanging from your toggle bolts. Choosing the method to use is very important and can keep you from having a bigger problem later. If you do not choose the right method for the weight you plan on hanging the drywall on your ceiling will break, and whatever you are hanging will come crashing down. Now not only do you have to put the toggle bolt up all over again, but you now have to repair a hole in your ceiling. Therefore, before installing the toggle bolt consider the weight of the object you plan to hang, the thickness of the drywall on your ceiling, and the weight limit of the toggle bolt. Here are a few different methods you may want to consider.

Hang the Bolt from the Drywall

This method is the easiest. It is also for only very light objects. This method also depends on the thickness of the drywall. The thicker the drywall the more support it will...

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I have done this a few times. When things like doors opening and closing jiggle the screws in the sheet rock, they hollow out the rock around the threads and stop holding. If you don't want that 60 lbs setting on the island one day, you need to hang it from a support. Climb in the attic if possible, and put a couple of two by four across several ceiling joist to distribute the weight load. Then make small holes in the sheet rock and attach the supports to the the two by fours you installed over the ceiling joist. If there is a floor above the kitchen, Install the two by fours directly above the Island. Us long screws to reach through the sheet rock and into the ceiling joist. Hang your weight from the two by fours, and if the two by fours are not concealed by the object you are hanging, go around the two by fours with crown molding or other trim to make it look like it belongs where it is...

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Watch more How to Do Basic Exercises videos: http://www.howcast.com/videos/429912-...

If you want to get a good workout with a heavy bag, you will have to make enough room and ensure that it doesn't fall on you in the middle of training. Get some help and secure things the right way.

Step 1: Search for the right joist
Search the garage rafters or basement ceiling for a six-by-six-inch ceiling joist to hang the heavy bag. Make sure that the location allows a clear area, five feet around, for the bag to swing free.

Tip
The beam should support at least four times the weight of the bag.

Step 2: Make sure bolt's long enough
Measure the ceiling joist and use an eye bolt that is two to three inches longer than the joist. Be sure when measuring to include the eye of the bolt.

Step 3: Drill a hole
Drill a hole all the way through the joist, from top to bottom. Use a drill bit equal to the diameter to the eye bolt.

Step 4: Tighten...

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Measuring tape Eye bolt nut and washer Stepladder Drill Pliers Screwdriver Chains Friends

Step 1 Search the garage rafters or basement ceiling for a six-by-six-inch ceiling joist to hang the heavy bag. Make sure that the location allows a clear area, five feet around, for the bag to swing free.

Quick Tip:

The beam should support at least four times the weight of the bag.

Step 2 Measure the ceiling joist and use an eye bolt that is two to three inches longer than the joist. Be sure when measuring to include the eye of the bolt.

Step 3 Drill a hole all the way through the joist, from top to bottom. Use a drill bit equal to the diameter to the eye bolt.

Step 4 Slide the...

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1Computing
no object, with adverbial Switch from one effect, feature, or state to another by using a toggle.

‘the play/pause button toggles between those functions’

with object ‘there are a number of attributes which can be toggled on or off’

‘While you are typing, there's a button which toggles between CAPS, lower case, numbers, and punctuation modes.’ ‘The pilot will be able to use the touch-screen, manually toggle through the screens using the buttons on the throttle and side-stick controller or use a voice recognition system.’ ‘One button toggles power on and off, another resets the display, and one exits the on-screen menu.’ ‘If you want to go back to add or amend what you've written, simply toggle through the pages on the little digital display and then carry on writing on the page in question.’ ‘I could print or save this graph and toggle 3 - D mode on and...
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Hi Linda, Sorry it took me a little longer to respond to your question than I generally take. Please forgive the delayed response. You asked if a 71 old arthritic lady do such a project? Absolutely! I recently gave my 71 year old Mother-In-Law a battery operated drill for her birthday. She loves it, and most importantly, she uses it. So yes, “you can do this!” Obviously, you’ll need a battery operated drill to create the holes for the toggle bolts. Metal toggle bolts can shoulder a lot of weight, around 25lbs to 50lbs, depending on the size, and toggle bolts are an ideal solution for drywall. I can make a video for you showing you how to do this step by step if you would like, however, I must say that we’re a little backed up with video requests, so it would be about a month out. Regards,...

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This depends mostly on just how heavy the canopy is, and what material your ceiling is made from.

If your canopy is a simple cloth material without any attachments, and you can weigh it by holding it while weighing yourself, you might be able to "safely" attach it to your ceiling using "toggle-bolts". These spring-loaded, easy-to-use, strong, and otherwise useful gadgets can 'save the day' when dealing with ceilings made from standard 'sheetrock' (gypsum, drywall, etc.).

Of course, the more 'toggle-bolt-hook-supports' you install, the better off you will be, since you will be spreading the load over more fastening points. Thus, the ceiling material is less likely to be 'compromised' by excessive weight on any given point.

You can purchase "Swag Hook kits" (see link for one example at Amazon) that contain a 'toggle-bolt' for this kind of installation. The kits even include a dual-threaded component, in the event your hook location actually lands on a ceiling joist...

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Eye bolts provide a sturdy choice for fastening items to the ceiling. Whether you're hanging plants, anchoring cords or displaying a decorative item, a firmly anchored eye bolt ensures it stays in place and doesn't pull out of the ceiling. The bolts pull out of plaster and drywall once weight is placed on them, so it's necessary to install them in a ceiling joist so the threads on the hook are anchored well. Finding the joist and installing the hook properly prevents damage to the finish on the ceiling.

Locate a ceiling joist in the desired hanging area. Pass an electronic stud finder over the ceiling until the sensor lights up and indicates a joist location. Thump the location lightly with the handle of a screwdriver to verify the location. If it makes a solid sound, a joist is present. Mark the location lightly with a pencil.

Screw the eye bolt into the pilot hole by hand. If the hook is difficult to turn, insert the shaft of a screwdriver into the eye of the hook....

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Hey I bought this joist mount pull up bar in Calgary for $80 - your just not going to be able to buy it for $30 as you can in the states because of shipping, etc. I had to call 20 local fitness stores to find this one retailer that carried it.

Anyway, I'm installing it in my basement and was hoping I could get some of your advice on how to install it. I don't know exactly which joist would be best - a single joist, a double joist, or the main set of support beams in my house's basement. The wierd thing is that the screws to attach it into the single joist are much more longer than the actual beam/joist.

Here's some pics of what's going on:

*sorry about having to break up the links, I'm new but I think I'm using enough care here so that you know I'm not a spammer. I will come back and fix the links when I hit 30 posts.

The area above my workout space
i9.photobucket. com/albums/a53/korzym/Image012.jpg

Close up of typical beam
i9.photobucket....

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There's certainly something inviting about a low-slung interior: a platform bed spilling its duvet onto hardwood, poufs and floor pillows in beckoning piles, stone slabs as coffee tables. Your shoes can come off; your body can puddle. It's very undeniably cozy, a room that clings to the floor.

But what about looking up? It's easy to forget that your airspace—in addition to your floors and your walls—is a canvas to decorate. And all the easy ways to do it (think: single dangling pendant bulb, a glinting mobile, a little planter dangling from twine) have one thing in common: They require that you put a hook in the ceiling.

Experienced home renovators will want me to scream this next part: To hang anything remotely heavy—a ceiling fan, a chandelier, a bike rack, a Calder (you've got one, no?)—from the ceiling, you'll want to mount it directly into a joist (that is, the wooden structure of the house itself).

But if what you'd like to hang is more of a delicate...

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