Calculating floor load strength

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by

Mitch

Last Updated February 27, 2016 01:09 AM

Well I'm sure this had been covered over and over. I could not find the formula I seek. I'm building a storage room in the back of a large steel building on my property and I was thinking I'd use the roof of my storage cube as place to put pallets and store junk. Nothing heavy I'd say no more that 300 pounds per pallet so that's about 300 every 4' squared I'm not sure of the span yet I plan to sheath it with osb prob 1/2 but what I'm looking for is a formula I can use something like
A 2x4 frame spanning 10' with joist spaced at 16' will support =

A 2x4 frame spanning 15' with joist spaced at 16' will support =

A 2x6 frame spanning 10' with joist spaced at 16' will support =

A 2x6 frame spanning 15' with joist spaced at 16' will support =

And so on

Think anyone can help me out?

Answers...

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Well I'm sure this had been covered over and over. I could not find the formula I seek. I'm building a storage room in the back of a large steel building on my property and I was thinking I'd use the roof of my storage cube as place to put pallets and store junk. Nothing heavy I'd say no more that 300 pounds per pallet so that's about 300 every 4' squared I'm not sure of the span yet I plan to sheath it with osb prob 1/2 but what I'm looking for is a formula I can use something like
A 2x4 frame spanning 10' with joist spaced at 16' will support =

A 2x4 frame spanning 15' with joist spaced at 16' will support =

A 2x6 frame spanning 10' with joist spaced at 16' will support =

A 2x6 frame spanning 15' with joist spaced at 16' will support =

And so on

Think anyone can help me...

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Many of the structural calculations involved in construction are relatively simple. Naturally, there is no substitute for a professional engineer when you're faced with complicated or uncommon structural problems, but basic load-bearing calculations are well within the capabilities of many carpenters and homeowners. Most timber-framed systems can be analysed with the same general formulas. In the case of a floor, you can determine the load capacity fairly accurately with nothing more than the size, space and span of the floor joists.

Write down the beam strength formula: Maximum load in kilograms = FBd^2 / 9L.

Fill in the values for B, d and L. B is the breadth of the joist, in centimetres. If your floor system uses standard timber, this will be 3.75 cm (1.5 inches). The d is the depth of the joist in inches, which you will have to measure. L is the span, in metres. The span is the unsupported distance over which the joist must bear its load.

Determine the...

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Peter:

There are two loads you need to be concerned about:

1. The static weigh of the machine

2. The operational loads imposed.

Although the operational loads of a rolling mill are not as high as other types of industrial equipment they still need to be taken into consideration.

These loads will the imposed on the floor through the feet or base of the machine. Machines is approximately 2.4 x 3.6 meters or a total of 8.64 square meters. Assuming that the entire base is available and there are no leveling pads then the force exerted on the floor is 125KNewtons (assuming that the weigh not given in metric tonnes) so the total force imposed by the machine when not working is approximately 14.4 kN/m^2.

Although it appears that the factory floor rating is marginally adequate, the safety factor is only 1.38. Also this does not consider any vibrational load when the machine is in operation.

Since the available floor size is larger, you could spread...

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Using span tables to size joists and rafters is a straight-forward process when you understand the structural principles that govern their use.

by Paul Fisette

© 1997

Wood is naturally engineered to serve as a structural material: The stem of a tree is fastened to the earth at its base (foundation), supports the weight of its branches (column) and bends as it is loaded by the wind (cantilever beam). A complete analysis of wood's mechanical properties is complex, but understanding a few basics of lumber strength will allow you to size joists and rafters with the use of span tables.

Let's start by taking a broad view. The structural goal of a house is to safely transfer building loads (weights) through the foundation to the supporting soil. Remember when your science teacher said: every action has an opposite and equal reaction? Well every building load has an equal "reaction load". If, when the loads of the house are combined, the house weighs more than...

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"In any contest between power and patience, bet on patience." -- W.B. Prescott

© 2018 IEEE GlobalSpec. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without permission is...

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Instructions for Calculating Beam & Carried Spans

Refer to the above illustration to determine the beam / header needed for your application. Determine the beam / header span (length) and the span carried (supported) by the beam / header. Click on the appropriate beam, this will take you to the calculation table for your project. The column on the left of each chart labeled BEAM SPAN represents the beam length (with bearing) required for your project. The top column labled SPAN CARRIED BY BEAM determines the span supported by your beam. The box on the chart that matches across your beam span and down from the span carried represents the Better Header® product which suits your needs. Use BEAM LEGEND chart for description of Better Header® beam number(s) that will best suit your...
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To calculate live maximum floor live load capacity:

Allowable extreme fiber stress in tension (in psi or kPa)

(Assumed to be 1/2 flexural strength)

Thickness of slab (in inches or mm)

Modulus of subgrade reaction (in pci or MPa/m)

Modulus of elasticity(in psi or kPa)

(assumed to equal 4000000 psi or 27579028 kPa)

Results:

Formula:

w = 257.876s ( kh / E ) ^ 0.5

Where,

w = Maximum Allowable Stationary Live Load,

k =...

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