Can baseboards be used in one pipe steam heating system?

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by

Doreen

Last Updated December 05, 2016 08:09 AM

I just switched to natural gas and had a new Weil-McLain steam boiler installed. (I originally had an oil boiler with steam heat.) It is a one pipe system and I have the old style radiators, except for wrought iron baseboards in two rooms (main level bathroom, and small "den").

I had no problem with heat in any rooms before the gas conversion and new boiler installation. Now two the rooms with baseboards (they are connected through the shared wall because the furthest room is on a slab) do not have heat unless I keep the thermostat set at 80 degrees. I can hear the heat trying to work... almost like clinking and ticking sounds (not banging and clanging).

The boiler company installed new vents, and made sure all the radiators are sloped correctly. But nothing has worked. They say there's not enough pressure building up, and that the pipe(s) to those rooms aren't big enough around. (Yet, it worked...

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I just switched to natural gas and had a new Weil-McLain steam boiler installed. (I originally had an oil boiler with steam heat.) It is a one pipe system and I have the old style radiators, except for wrought iron baseboards in two rooms (main level bathroom, and small "den").

I had no problem with heat in any rooms before the gas conversion and new boiler installation. Now two the rooms with baseboards (they are connected through the shared wall because the furthest room is on a slab) do not have heat unless I keep the thermostat set at 80 degrees. I can hear the heat trying to work... almost like clinking and ticking sounds (not banging and clanging).

The boiler company installed new vents, and made sure all the radiators are sloped correctly. But nothing has worked. They say there's not enough pressure building up, and that the pipe(s) to those rooms aren't big enough around. (Yet, it worked before!) They do have to come back for a third time, because...

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Can 1" Copper pipes be used for Steam heating? | Brownstoner

mystiky

I have a plumber working in my house right now, and after returning from work, I found out that the two "new runs" were made with what looks to be using 1" copper pipes. Can copper lines really be used for Steam Heating? My system uses Weil-McLain EG-45 with Slant/Fin 80, which have rated output at**_:_** 620 to 840 Btuh (180??F at 4GPM) http://www.slantfin.com/index.php/products/baseboard-residential/multi--pak-80 Please let me know your opinion.

mystiky

By the way, for more information, I looked at the printing on the pipe and in red letters it says type M.

wiley

typically copper is frowned upon with steam because the joints don't hold up as well as threaded pipe. The copper expands and contracts more under steam. That being said I have one small run in my home that is copper (the rest are all threaded) and it hasn't given my any...

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Check the vents

After that, make sure the vents are unblocked. Rust, corrosion or something blocking the flow of air will not let it function properly. The air should pass through properly in your steam heating system. If the air flow does not move properly the air will get trapped inside the radiator and will not let steam enter. Moreover, if you see a blocked vent, then get it from a local hardware store. Also, let your steam heating system to cool down before you unscrew the vent to replace it. Check if your inlet valves are all the way shut or open as this will help prevent noises in the heating system. The position of the inlet valves will assist to regulate the...

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Wow I can't believe some of the answers that you have gotten here.They are correct that you should not use PVC pipe it can't handle the heat and I have never seen CPVC used in heating lines,some might say it is ok but I would never use it.Type L copper is generally used for potable water lines and type M is used for heating systems,{ yes type M is thinner walled but the finned tubing is even thinner and a heating system should never get above 30 psi.unlike potable water systems that could have up to 90 psi.] I am not aware of codes that require black iron pipes for heating,sometimes it is used at the boiler for the manifolds but gets quite pricey for the whole system.With that said copper is getting too expensive to do a large system with these days and plastic PEX type tubing is being used all over now and it has a proven track record.However it is a special pipe used for heating,it should be marked for heating systems and not for potable water.Some will be...

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How to Run a Hot Water Zone Off a Steam Boiler

Here's a simple way to add a hot water zone to a steam-heated building without using a heat exchanger. Your new zone can serve an indirect domestic water heater, or a baseboard zone, but that zone must be not more than 30 feet above the boiler water line. At higher altitudes, it will have to be even closer to the boiler, because of the drop in atmospheric pressure.All you'll need will be an all-bronze Bell & Gossett Series l00 circulator, two BSA-3/4 Flo Control valves, an angle thermometer, three full-port 3/4" ball valves, a switching relay, an Aquastat and a few feet of 3/4" copper tubing.
Here's how you do it. First, you have to remember that this is an open system. The water above the boiler water line can easily be hotter than 212 degrees when the boiler is steaming. The only thing that keeps the water in a liquid state is the pump's pressure. The trouble is, when the pump is shut off, its pressure...

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My house uses one small section (4 foot), of fin-type "baseboard" for single pipe steam in a small room. It does work.

From what I understand the lack of vertical space is the issue. In a traditional radiator the steam can go up, the water down with the height of the radiator - with the baseboard the steam and water have to fit in a small pipe. Because of this it has to be pitched and SHORT, limiting the amount of BTUs you can get out of any section.

I have no experience with 2 pipe changes and extra return fittings.

BTW - another option I've seen done - Most Steam boilers still have fittings which were designed to run the hot boiler water as a heat source for an external hot water heater (combined heat/hot water boiler). My brothers house, they turned the hot water heater loop into a loop for baseboard heating in his basement. I have no idea if this is code, or even a good idea, but it does seem to work.

I'd fix the pitch, properly vent the sections -...

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Steam Heating systems

Advantages of Steam Heating over other methods | Differences of Steam from Forced Hot Water Heating Systems | Steam Heating Efficiency Factors | Steam piping | General System Design | Piping Arrangement | Pressure Conditions | Condensate Return | Codes and Regulations | Water Conditioning | Piping Supports | One-pipe Systems | Two-pipe System | Steam Trap Selection | Steam Traps | Good Piping Practice Prevents Water Hammer in Steam Systems | Heat exchanger installation to prevent water hammer | Vacuum breakers | Steam heating Coils

Operation and maintenance of steam heating systems | Common problems with steam heating systems | Water hammer in steam lines | Water hammer in condensate return lines | Maintenance items for service technicians | References and further reading

In open - gravity - steam heating systems water is heated to its boiling point 100°C (212єF) and steam rises by convection through pipes to heat exchangers (radiators) located...

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By Todd Fratzel on Heating

Update: This is a popular article written several years ago. While pricing may have changed the basic comparison still holds true today.

Heating Fuel – Propane Vs. Oil

When we built our new house one of the big decisions I had to make was what type of heating fuel to use. Should we use the traditional oil heat that over 90% of people in New England rely on? Or should we use propane (natural gas is not available here in this part of NH).

Pros and Cons

The answer to that question is pretty complicated when you sit down and think about it. For us I already knew we’d have propane in the house to cook with and for our direct vent fire place. For me one of my biggest concerns with oil was having an oil tank in my basement that could potentially leak some day.

The other big issue to consider was venting the two different types of fuel. An oil fired boiler would require either a direct vent out the side of the house...

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