Can I bury a bare ground connecting rod?

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Storm Season

Lightning is a common cause of failures in photovoltaic (PV) and wind-electric systems. A damaging surge can occur from lightning that strikes a long distance from the system, or even between clouds. But most lightning damage is preventable. Here are some of the most cost-effective techniques that are generally accepted by power system installers, based on decades of experience. Follow this advice, and you have a very good chance of avoiding lightning damage to your renewable energy (RE) system.

Get Grounded

Grounding is the most fundamental technique for protection against lightning damage. You can’t stop a lightning surge, but you can give it a direct path to ground that bypasses your valuable equipment, and safely discharges the surge into the earth. An electrical path to ground will constantly discharge static electricity that accumulates in an aboveground structure. Often, this prevents the attraction of lightning in the first...

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We're having a new concrete patio poured in a couple weeks.

The new concrete will go over where I currently have the ground rod at the station entrance. That rod is connected with buried #4 wire to a series of other ground rods including the house utility ground.

Is there any reason I shouldn't just leave that connection there and just let the concrete bury it? The copper strip (2 inch copper strip) running from the ground rod to the box where I have the feedline connections and transient protectors can just stay where it is next to the house and would come up through the concrete.

I don't want to relocate the shack entrance so the next closest location for a ground rod that would NOT be covered by concrete is about 10 feet farther away.

My wife doesn't like the idea of boxing off and not putting concrete in a small area around the existing ground rod location so that I can inspect that connection if I ever need to. Something about it not looking good to her....

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What exactly does it mean to ground a Antenna?

The title says it all. What exactly does grounding a antenna mean? And how do you ground a antenna? I'm a amateur when it comes to antennas so I'd appreciate if someone could explain all this to me. I'm a shortwave listener and am looking to move on to a bigger antenna so these are my questions. Thank you!

1. What does it mean to ground a antenna? (Like what is the point of grounding a antenna)
2. How do you ground a antenna? (What is the step by step process of grounding a antenna)

If you could, please explain these simply. I'm not a professional on this like the rest of you on here
Or link videos, how-to's or anything else that will help!

Quote:

The whole grounding issue is why I have not, to date, put up an external antenna. I make due with an attic mounted antenna. My basic understanding is...

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There is the equipment grounding conductor. That is what connects to the ground bus in the panel and runs to the equipment for permant installations or to the ground pin on a receptacle.

The equipment grounding conductor serves 2 purposes.

One to make sure that any metal in that building is at the same potential. The only way to guarntee that is that no current be flowing through the "ground" under normal conditions.

The other purpose is as a return path for fault current. If the hot shorts out in an appliance or tool the current has to flow back through the equipment grounding conductor to the transformer ground. The "other ground" the earth is not good enough conductor to trip the breaker.

The the equipment grounding conductor is either bonded to the neutral at the sub-panel or a separate equipment ground conductor is run from the sub-panel back to the main panel where it is bonded to the neutral.

The other "ground" is the ground electrode...

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Check your local wiring codes and schedule inspections.

Several inspections and permits are required for most residential construction projects, especially when it involves electrical work.

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To make sure you're up to code, you may need to schedule temporary service inspection, a rough-in inspection, and a final inspection. This needs to be done whether you're doing it yourself or hiring a subcontractor.

The National Electrical Code requires all GFCIs within 5 feet of the floor to be child-safe and clearly marked. Outdoor GFCIs must also be weather resistant and clearly marked, even if it has a weather cover. Check your local wiring codes to see if a GFCI is an acceptable replacement for a non-grounded two-prong outlet. There are acceptable installation procedures for non-grounded GFCI usually involving putting a sticker on the outlet cover stating "Non-Appliance Ground." In some areas, you may need a GFCI due to nearby water...
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Given a feed (whether a single cable or a group of wires in a conduit) and/or a panel, the same rating or breaker protection in amperes for 120/240 volts and for 120 volts only will give you up to twice as many watts for the 120/240 volt installation whether the usage on the 120/240 volt installation is 120 volts or 240 volts or any combination.

As mentioned earlier you have two hots, one neutral, and one ground wire for 120/240 volts. You have one hot, neutral, and ground for 120 volts.

Note that, for example with a 120/240 volt 40 amp feed, while you are drawing fewer than 40 amps using one hot and the neutral, you may not draw more than 40 amps using the other hot and the neutral.

The first panel in a given building needs ground rods.

Last edited by AllanJ; 08-09-16 at...
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It is not actually possible to do this with a standard multi-meter and get any kind of a reading you can use. The local AHJ will not agree to anything unless you can show them your readings and even then they can choose to adopt the theory of (2) ground rods are better concept which is what they have done in our area.

Here is the manufacturer of the equipment that can do the resistance ohms test and the model 382152 sells for about $ 199.00 dollars.
http://www.extech.com/instrument/cat...oundResis.html

The 382152 is the less expensive and since it uses actual leads to ground will most likely get the attention of the inspector before a clamp on will if that is your goal. ( and for those electricians who still fight the (2) ground rod issue )

Regardless it is cheaper to simply buy another ground rod ( 6-10 bucks ) additional # 6 AWG Bare wire ( does not need to be protected unless subject to physical damage ) and their should be a small hole made into...

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You'll need two cable clamps (like these http://www.homedepot.com/webapp/wcs/stor... ) and two 8 foot (at least) long by 5/8 inch diameter (at least) ground rods—available at Home Depot in the electrical wiring section. The video (below) shows these. You'll also need an appropriate length of #4 gauge solid copper wire. Insulated or not, whichever is cheaper. Expect all this to cost $125 or so.

Some might tell you that only one ground rod is needed, and that is true if you can prove the conductance of the ground is adequate. However, the proof of this is more expensive and trouble than simply installing two ground rods.

The rods need to be at least ten feet apart in such a way that the wire leading to them can be protected from tree roots, digging, etc. The usual choice for convenience of installation is next to the building near the service panel. If the wire needs to be exposed (as spanning a driveway or patio before it can reach soil) use armored cable, or conduit. Do not...

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Earthing Basics

Q. In a high-tech age, why is the concept of Earthing so important?
A. What is most profound about Earthing is that it is so natural and simple, and that it affects every aspect of human physiology. When you ground yourself, the entire body readjusts to a new level of functioning, the level, in fact, it seems to have been designed for throughout evolution. Many people who have lived Earthed for some years say that they do not want to go back to living ungrounded. They feel the difference. Living Earthed broadly elevates your quality of life to a level that seems not otherwise possible.
James Oschman, Ph.D., an internationally-renowned expert on energy medicine and a member of our board of advisors, describes the phenomenon thusly: “Recently I attended a meeting on the East coast. One of my colleagues came in from the West coast. She had a bad case of jet lag. I told her to take her shoes and socks...

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Improve the attraction of powder to your parts while powder coating.

If you are powder coating a metal part, it should be grounded. The grounding is what attracts the powder to the part. The better the ground, the less problems you have, especially when doing multiple coats. Often a

powder coating gun

or the guns control box will come with a little 18 gauge ground wire and a mini alligator clip that you can connect to your part to ground it. I will call this the "stock" ground. The stock ground continues through the control box, through the wire it uses to plug into a wall outlet and after that is a mystery to me. This is not a good example of a ground. No matter how good of gun you have, you should have a DEDICATED GROUNDING ROD.




What are the advantages of using a grounding rod when powder coating?


Faraday Cage Areas:

Using this ground method helps with a phenomenon called faraday cage areas. Faraday cage areas...

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Ground Rod Installation Instructions

MOST OF US HAVE OVER THE YEARS SIMPLY POUNDED THE GROUND RODS WE USE DIRECTLY INTO THE GROUND AND THEN MADE OUR CONNECTIONS. I HAVE LEARNED THAT THIS IS NOT THE BEST WAY TO INSTALL A GOOD GROUND ROD. IN FACT, POUNDING THE GROUND ROD ALL THE WAY IN DAMAGES THE GROUND ROD AND WILL REDUCE THE LIFE OF THE ROD. WHEN YOU POUND IN THE ROD, THE ROCKS IN THE GROUND SCRATCH OFF THE COPPER PLATING EXPOSING THE UNDERLYING STEEL. THE STEEL CORRODES AND THUS YOUR ROD STARTS TO DETERIORATE.

LOCATION CONSIDERATIONS: CHOOSE A LOCATION AS CLOSE TO THE CONTROLLER AS POSSIBLE. ALSO LOOK FOR ROUTES FOR YOUR GROUND WIRE WHICH WILL BE AS STRAIGHT AS POSSIBLE. KEEP IN MIND THAT ELECTRICITY, LIKE WATER, WILL TRAVEL THROUGH THE PATH OF LEAST RESISTANCE. BENDS, CURVES, AND DISTANCE CHANGE CONDUCTIVE CHARACTORISTICS. IF USING A MULTIPLE ROD CONFIGURATION, AND IF YOU HAVE THE REAL ESTATE TO ACCOMODATE, INSTALL THE RODS 2 TIMES THEIR LENTH FROM EACH OTHER. THE...

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Start >>

Serious Engine Problems:
Replace, Rebuild, Or Junk The Vehicle?

When a car or truck develops a serious engine problem, such as a loud knocking sound, the first step, besides getting the vehicle out of traffic, is to diagnose the problem.

The repair options depend on the diagnosis. A connecting rod knock is a serious engine problem, but it's not the worst thing that can happen. Problems such as overheating and seizing, or "throwing a rod", can render an engine unfit for rebuilding.

Other reasons to rebuild an engine:

It burns a lot of oil. Low compression caused by worn piston rings. When a vehicle gets old and lacks power, a compression test can reveal the degree of wear inside the engine. Then, a "cylinder leak-down" test can pinpoint the exact locations of wear or leakage in each cylinder.

Repair Decisions:

Before my 99 Jimmy developed a rod knock, the engine ran just fine. It had plenty of power and it didn't burn...

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This section needs to be developed to explain:

The relationship between the power (safety) ground and grounding networks

Single point of entry and interconnection of power ground

Recommended grounding practice

Basic grounding and lightning protection for a home or small office:

Start with at least two ground rods, a threadless tapered coupling, a ground rod driving sleeve, an Erico Hammerlock for connecting to the ground rod, and at minimum #6 bare wire. Solid #6 is common, I prefer stranded just because its less likely to break (solid wire will break if it is nicked and exposed to flexing or vibration). Personally I would use #4 for home or #2 for an office.

Drive at least two coupled ground rods to get depth. If you are in a heavy lightning area, use two sets on opposite sides or ends of your building. Bring each ground rod connection independently to your electric panel ground bus.

If you live on sand like we do, use...

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See larger 60 amp Subpanel / with 240Volt and 120Volt
Use with both 240Volt and 120Volt breakers
1) 60-150 Amp breaker replaces any 240 breaker in main box near top of box

2) Two Hot wires connect to 60-150 Amp breaker in main breaker box. Either hot wire can connect to either hot busbar inside subpanel.

3) Neutral connects to Neutral busbar so subpanel can power 120 and 240 breakers.

4) Ground wire connects to Ground busbar. Ground busbar can be purchased separately.

If Subpanel located at another structure, for example garage several hundred feet away, might be cheaper to use ground rod located outside other structure. If structure is farther than 140', then wire gauge increases from #6 to #4. Consult local electrician for correct gauge.

Resources:
See wire size chart
Electrical formulas

Main breaker wires are HOT when main breaker is OFF
Main breaker wires are HOT when main breaker is OFF unless meter is pulled
...
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THE RF EARTH SYSTEM
What is it and why?

FIRST, AN IMPORTANT WARNING!

Do not confuse an RF earth with an ELECTRICAL SAFETY EARTH. I don’t use the mains earth in my shack because all my equipment is 12 volt. However, if you have any mains driven gear, make sure that it’s properly earthed. The house wiring earth is often full of crackles and spikes and all forms of mains-born interference. While it’s best not to use this earth, you must bear in mind that all your equipment requiring a safety earth must be properly grounded. A safety earth is usually a bad RF earth. However, a good RF earth may also be a good safety earth.

MYSTERIES BENEATH THE GROUND:

I heard a chap talking on 80 metres the other evening. He was laughing about RF ground systems and asking his mate why people bother to bury miles of expensive copper wire beneath the ground simply to warm up the soil. He mentioned, all that...

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It is not necessary to bury the boundary wire. An effective boundary can be created in minutes by simply laying the wire along the ground and fastening it in place with lawn staples (also known as sod staples, landscaping staples or grass staples). The boundary cable is surprisingly resilient and can stand up to light traffic, and even vehicular traffic. Even professionals will often not bury the wire when the installation is for a very large area, particularly a wooded area where it is difficult to operate a mechanical trencher. Over time, (three to five years) the cable will bury itself as the lawn grows and leaves fall.

The advantage of the no dig method is the time required for installation. However, the wire is visible so it is less attractive than buried wire. On the surface the wire is also more susceptible to breaks especially due to lawn mowers and edgers. Critters such as squirrels may also pose an issue as they are know to chew on the wire. Of course, being on the...

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