Ceiling rose with twin wire, no earth?

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Connect all reds together. This will be one of the triple brass blocks on a standard ceiling rose.

Identify the black from the switch (the "switched live"). Connect this to the double brass block on a standard ceiling rose.

Connect the remaining two blacks together. This will be to the other triple brass block on a standard ceiling rose.

Brown from the light to the black from the switch. This will be to the double brass block on a standard ceiling rose.

Blue from the light to the two blacks. This will be the triple brass block with the two blacks on a standard ceiling rose.

Connect all the earths together (green/yellow).

If you do not have a standard ceiling rose then you must use "chocolate block" connectors to wire it up.

If your house has brown and blue wiring then the equivalents are brown=red (live), blue=black (neutral).

Look at:
...

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When the circuit has been

isolated and tested

we can get started.

Before you start disconnecting any cables it’s a good idea to mark them so we can identify them when we fit the new ceiling rose

Disconnecting and removing the
ceiling roseEdit

Loosen terminals 1 and 8. Remove the flex and the lamp holder to get them out of our way (you will need to unhook the ends of the flex from the retaining hooks on the ceiling rose base). Using an indelible marker pen, mark the end of the three live conductors. These are the ones in terminals 3, 4 and 5 as shown in Fig.1 above. Now loosen terminals 2, 3 and 9 then remove them from the terminal blocks. Now all the wires for the switch cable (cable C) are free. Now put a band of insulation tape around the end of the cable to identify it as the switch cable. (So, now the whole cable is clearly marked as the ‘switch cable’ by the tape and one of the cores will have marker pen on it to identify it as the...
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If you are new to lighting circuits, this is a good place to start. Here we will explain how the most common lighting circuit works then we’ll move on to some variations that you may see in your home that may appear to differ from this.

N.B. The diagrams below shows the new (harmonised) cable colours. If the cables in your circuits are Red and Black please see Multi-point radial lighting circuit – old cable colours.

Fig 1 shows what is referred to as a radial circuit (sometimes called a ‘loop-in’ or ‘multi-point radial lighting circuit’).

Fig 1: multi point (loop-in) radial lighting circuit

The light wiring diagram shows how the live feed from the Consumer unit (fuse board, shown in blue in Fig 1) feeds into the first ceiling rose (ceiling rose A, Fig 1). This would be cable A in the diagram below (Fig 2) which shows how the ceiling rose is terminated. This live feed now loops back out of the rose (cable B, Fig 2) and feeds power to the next ceiling...

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Where does the power show up?

You'll have two sources of power, the live conductors (all red or brown or combination of and there will be two or three depending on whether or not it's the last fitting in the loop). They should be live permanently. Then you've got a black insulated conductor which should have red sleeving which is the switched live. This should only be live when , not surprisingly, it's switched on.

Have you changed the fitting recently? Has it worked since? It may be that the switched live wasn't sleeved and you've connected it with the rest of the neutrals although I would have thought this would blow a fuse or trip the MCB.

If you don't have a sleeved black conductor then you'll need to do a continuity test between the black conductor at the switch and the black conductors in the fitting to determine which is switched live. WITH THE POWER OFF OF...

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Warning: To complete electrical works you must comply with Electrical Regulations - Click here for more information.

Take a good look at the ceiling rose diagram and identify the switch wires. These are the wires which give most people problems.

The power comes into the ceiling rose from either the consumer unit or the last lamp. It is then sent to the next lamp via the connecting blocks in the ceiling rose. This is straight forward as you can see.

The live wire coming in is connected to the live wire going out. Ditto for the Neutral and Earth wires.

When a light fitting is attached to the ceiling rose it could be wired into the Neutral terminal and the live terminal shown in the rose but it would of course be on all of the time. For it to work properly it has to be interrupted by a switch.

This is easy, in that a cable (switch wire) is added. One of the wires from the switch wire is connected to the live terminal. This takes live current to the...

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Replacing a ceiling rose is a job that can be carried out by a competent DIYer, but as always, if you’re not confident working with electricity you should use the services of a reliable electrician.

The best way to find a decent electrician is by asking your friends (Facebook is perfect). Failing that, check your local paper or use a website like TrustATrader, Rated People or Checkatrade.

Below you’ll find a list of tools needed to replace a ceiling rose. You should have most of them in your DIY toolkit. If not, a quick trip to Wickes or B&Q will sort you out.

Tools required

Side cutters (snips) Insulated medium size screwdriver Insulated terminal screwdriver Wire strippers Marker pen Either test lamps or a meter to confirm the electrical supply to the ceiling rose is isolated

Start by switching off the consumer unit and removing the appropriate circuit fuse / miniature circuit breaker.

fig 1

Fig 1 shows the most common way a ceiling rose...

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Line diagram of a two way lighting circuit using junction boxes (fig 1).

fig 1

The junction box should be wired as shown below.

fig 2

Explanation of above picture. (fig 2)
The feed cable comes from a previous junction box or from the consumer unit, the red, black and earth wires are connected to separate terminals. The earth wire must be covered with green/yellow sleeving.

The cable going to the first light switch is connected as follows (fig 2). The red wire going to the switch is connected to the same terminal as the red wire from the feed cable, the black wire is unused, and the earth wire is connected to the same terminal as the earth wire from the feed cable.

The cable coming from the ceiling rose is connected as follows (fig 2). The red wire coming from the ceiling rose is unused, the black wire coming from the ceiling rose is connected to the same terminal as the black wire from the feed cable and the earth wire coming from...

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Hi Melanie,before to give you an answer ,I would ask you,if your vendor is an eletrician because he`ve gave ou an advice ,to not ghange the cables,this means, he can read he electrical report ? A very old electrical installation before 1990 is made up with two wire cable, without wire for earth; You have to check in your electrical report if the cables is two wire,or the cable is two wire+earth, doesn`l matter the colour or the size for sockets or for lights; If the cables is only two wires you need to change all the electrical installation with a new one; If the cables is twin cable, two wire +earth and the colours is black and red ,you need to change only the circuits that do not fit within the parameters of safety ;If the cable`s colours are blue and brown the installation is after 2008 and I think that is good; Regarding the earth on the switch ; drylining plastic box don`t need earth, surface plastic box need earth, and burried metal box need cpc; Check if you get earth to the...

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Ceiling roses are common in UK properties. Typically, one was fitted in each room, located in the centre of the ceiling.

Simple ceiling rose

This shows a ceiling rose with the cover removed. This is the most straightforward arrangement.

The cable marked 'IN' is the supply from the consumer unit or fusebox. This contains live, neutral and earth wires. These are permanently connected to the supply.

The 'SWITCH' cable connects to a one way switch.

The 'LAMP' cable connects to the light bulb or lamp. This is what hangs down into the room with the lampholder and lampshade on the end.

The neutral from the supply is permanently connected to the neutral for the lamp, just as in the earlier example. Both neutral wires are coloured blue.

The live from the consumer unit connects to the Loop terminal. This is permanently live. One of the switch wires also connects here, and is also permanently live. Both of these wires are coloured...

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Wiring a Ceiling Rose

One of the most prevalent electrical wiring systems for lighting circuits today is the ‘loop-in’ system so that one will be tackled in this article. The lights and their switches are run in a chain from the consumer unit (CU), or fuse box in older houses, using the ceiling rose as a key junction of the circuit as well as a means of supplying switched electricity to the central light fitting.

There is another popular method used when electrical wiring is being laid as a house is being built, called the junction box method. This is where the job of the ceiling rose is replaced by a junction box in the ceiling cavity above the rose. In this instance the ceiling rose then becomes a very simple connector and anchor point for the lamp flex so we will not cover that method in this article.

There are some important points to make about DIY electrical wiring. The first is to be realistic about your level of DIY skills and wiring knowledge and be...

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By: Chris Hogan MSc - Updated: 20 Mar 2017|*Discuss

One of the most prevalent electrical wiring systems for lighting circuits today is the 'loop-in' system so that one will be tackled in this article. The lights and their switches are run in a chain from the consumer unit (CU), or fuse box in older houses, using the ceiling rose as a key junction of the circuit as well as a means of supplying switched electricity to the central light fitting.

There is another popular method used when electrical wiring is being laid as a house is being built, called the junction box method. This is where the job of the ceiling rose is replaced by a junction box in the ceiling cavity above the rose. In this instance the ceiling rose then becomes a very simple connector and anchor point for the lamp flex so we will not cover that method in this article.

DIY Wiring – Assess Your Level of Competency

There are some important points to make about DIY electrical wiring. The first is...

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why do double insulated appliances not need an earth wire?

class 2 appliances are commonly known as double-insulated equipment, the live parts are encapsulated in basic and supplementary insulation (double), or one layer of reinforced insulation

An electrical appliance which is double insulated (which should be marked with the symbol to the left) does not have an earth wire fitted. The appliance is designed in such a way that the electrical parts can never come into contact with the outer casing of the device. Common double insulated appliances are hair dryers, radios, modern garden tools and cassette players.

A wet double insulated appliance is exceptionally dangerous – water is a good conductor of electricity and will easily reach the live electrical components within the case. Any human user touching the casing will then receive an electric shock.

For this reason, do not operate a mains radio, hairdryer or double insulated appliance in any wet area –...

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Assuming your wiring uses the ‘old’ core cable colours i.e Red (live), Black (neutral) and Green/Yellow (earth) then Fig.1 shows the most common way your ceiling rose will be connected.

Click Here – If the cables in your house have Brown (live), Blue (neutral) and Green/Yellow (earth) cores.

Fig.1 – click to enlarge

Cable A and Cable B are the live, neutral and earth loop to each of the lights in the circuit, (Cable A feeds in the live supply from the previous light in the circuit and cable B loops out to supply the next light in the circuit) these cables remain ‘live’ even if the light switch is off, this is why you should ALWAYS make sure the circuit is isolated before you start work.

Cable C is a twin Red and Earth which is connected to the light-switch.
1 and 8 – the live and neutral conductors that connect to the ceiling rose lamp holder.
2 – the return live (switch-wire) from the light-switch.
3 – the live feed to the...

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Please read the disclaimer before attempting any electrical work. If you are uncertain then contact a qualified electrician.

More Information

Wiring a ceiling rose may look confusing at first. But the aim of this guide is to help you do so correctly and to make it as easy as possible. The way a ceiling rose works is the power either comes from the consumer unit or the lamp before it (a radial circuit). The power will be sent from one lamp to another via connecting blocks that are connected to the live wire that goes out.


When a light is joined to the ceiling rose it will be wired into the neutral terminal as well as the live terminal that is shown in the...

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Hi,

In my bedroom, for a light, I just have a cable hanging down with a socket on the end for a bulb. The cable has no earth that I can see. It just has a live and neutral.

I did want to install a more modern looking light, such as this:


But I realise I cannot do it safely without an earth wire as they're metal. And I won't run the risk either. I will just make do with a modern looking lampshade on the existing setup if I can't find a way to do this properly.

So, does anyone know the cheapest way I could go about getting a safe setup here? I know that the house uses junction boxes. Could it be as simple as finding the junction box in the loft and somehow running a new cable down with an earth included? Or not? How would you run it down?

I haven't done much with electrics before, but I do know to switch off everything at the fuse box and remove all the fuses, and to check with a multimeter anyway before touching any wires.

Ps I...

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