Questions about: circuit-breaker - страница 3

Most advice you'll find online is for the US, which doesn't really apply to you. They use 120V, so appliances use more current for the same power, requiring more dedicated circuits. I wouldn't run a dedicated circuit for anything except the range (st
Isolator( pipe like structure) opening. Courtesy: ABB In short, Circuit Breaker(CB) is an on-load/offload device providing clearance of few millimeters. It can be operated automatically as well as manually whereas the Isolator is an off-load device t
Is it normal for a heavy load appliance to cause a circuit breaker to feel warm? Would something like a clothes dryer that had been operating for over 45 minutes or maybe an oven that been heating to 450 degrees cause the breaker to feel warm? After
Originally Posted by ray2047 Please post the picture and we will go from there. Suspect breaker has the yellow stickie, which fell off for me in the 2nd picture. Basically, think my lack of terminology/knowledge had me down the wrong path last night
All the devices on one of my breakers randomly stop working, and when checked with a multimeter, I see that the outlets are giving a voltage of ~8V rather than the ~125V I usually get. When I check that breaker at the panel, I get ~125V as I should.
I agree that more knowledge is a good thing, and more knowledge is obtainable - hit one of those big-box home improvement stores' bookshelf section (they only thing they're good for) and paw through "how to wire a house" books til you find one that y
Get yourself a Kill-a-Watt power meter and measure each of your loads on each circuit. They also make upscale units with backlights and storage so you can unplug it and look at the stored data in a bit more comfort. Take Watts or VA (whichever is lar
We came home last night to find one of our powerboards (outlet strips) had melted/caught fire. Pretty scary! Now I'm not 100% sure on what happened but I believe that there was an oil column heater (2000w or 2400w, we're in Australia so max 240V/10A
A tripping circuit breaker can mean there is a problem with your electrical system. A circuit breaker does the same job that fuses once did. A circuit breaker trip occurs when the circuit becomes too hot from heat generated by the electrical current