Did I damage this shower valve?

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I'm in the process of installing fixtures for a shower and realized yesterday that I had made a mistake and needed to expand the opening around the single control valve. It's a Moen with an insertable cartridge.

I removed some tile with a reciprocating saw and drill and am sure I didn't hit the valve at all.

However, now today I attempted to turn the water back on and—while in the off position—the valve now drips fairly steadily.

Did I likely damage the valve in the process of removing tile? Possibly through the vibrations of the saw/drill? What steps can/should I take to repair this? The surrounding plumbing is in perfect condition, the valve is just leaky.

Thank...

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http://www.plumberx.com
In this video we start by removing the old two handle tub and shower valve from inside the wall. First we remove the handles and spout leaving the shower head in place to hold up the old shower valve and keeping it there until the new shower valve is in place this makes it easy and keeps use inline with the new installation and makes it very easy to line up the new shower head. Now that we have the handle off its time to go around on the back side and cut into the wall or if were lucky there just may be a trap door on the back side that gives us access to the tub and shower valve from the back side. Once on the back side of the tub and shower valve we start by disconnecting the unions on the old two handle tub and shower valve. Now the part that goes up to the shower head is copper. What we are going to do here is take our torch and heat the solder connection and pull the valve loose from the shower head riser pipe. Now with the old tub and shower valve...

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Decent pair of grips on the body of the shower valve, behind (nearer to the wall) the larger set of splines. Unscrew valve in the usual way (anti-clockwise looking at splined end).
Don't damage the splines. When replacing, make sure you do it up tight, and re-fit the temperature stop cam (usually black plastic), otherwise its possible to unscrew the valve again if someone hefty turns it fully hot!

Alternatively make up special tool which is a steel tube, with outside diameter equal to inside diameter of shower body, inside diameter equal to outside diameter of shower valve, with a slot about 10mm deep cut across the end, the width of the outside diameter of shower valve. Length about 150mm with a 6mm tommy bar hole through the non slotted...

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Mr Knight is correct in suggesting what to do to look for leaks, but if you are getting enough of a leak to register on your water meter and to make a rushing sound behind your wall, you should be seeing visible water collecting on the floor below, unless this is under the slab.

The water can flow past the mixer while the shower mixer is closed, but only if the cartridge is bad AND there is a substantial pressure difference between the two sides. This can occur if you have the hot water turned off for repairs but the cold water runs past the valve into the hot water side.

Because the pressure on the hot side is supplied by the inlet on the cold side, the pressure on the two sides should be the same. That means that, for there to be a substantial pressure differential permitting flow from the hot side to the cold side, you would need to have a pretty big leak on the cold side. That would then allow that flow to continue, even if the supply valve at the water heater were...

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This comes down to money so let me address a few points. I deal with this on a regular basis.

- How much do you want to spend? You can go to the big box stores and buy various components relatively cheap and make them work together. It won't be the greatest set-up but it will work.

- If you want multiple heads, go Grohe or similar. Grohe provides good value at the price compared with some of the other high end stuff. It won't fail, you'll be happy and there are tons of options.

- Forget the body jets, nice buy overrated and only worthwhile if you have real good pressure

- Consider a rain head (ceiling head) and shower bar set-up this is a very nice combo; you could also go rain head and standard wall head combo as well. If this is a bigger shower with any type of bench the bar with head on hose is much nicer; you'll need a volume controller - 3 way minimum and a regulator (temperature valve) Grohe does make a single temp/volume body but you are better...

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After perusing the web and seeing numerous postings by folks complaining that the valve handle sticks out too far when in the off position, I have to concur... after 'dry fitting' the escutcheon and handle to my newly installed valve.

There is in fact a full half inch between the back of the handle and the escutcheon when in the OFF position, and the valve installation was followed to the LETTER, and questions answered by the Moen tech support group.

The 'plaster ground' is a plastic part that screws onto the valve and stays there until the valve is trimmed out after the wall surrounds are completed. It's purpose is to protect the valve from getting 'schmutzed up' with mortar, grout, drywall compound, whatever AND to provide a guide to setting the valve depth into the wall.

This 'plaster ground' is CLEARLY embossed on the front that the valve is to be installed deep enough in the wall that the surface of this plaster ground is FLUSH WITH THE FINISHED...

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Q. "What handle options are available with these Symmons shower systems?"
A. The handle options are:

Q. "I haven't seen many Symmons faucets in stores, is their quality any good?"
A. Symmons mainly makes top quality commercial grade faucets and doesn't (need to) advertise much. Rest assured that their quality is top notch and that you aren't paying for a big advertising budget when you purchase Symmons. The company has been around for many decades.

Q. "How can I stop my Temptrol shower valve from dripping?"
A. Replace the hot and cold washers using a TA-9 KIT. Inspect top surfaces of hot seat (T-1) and the cold seat (T-3) and if damaged replace with a TA-4 KIT.

Q. "Why is water coming out of my tub spout while I'm taking a shower, is this normal?"
A. A small stream of water (about the thickness of a pencil or less) coming from the tub spout while the valve is in the shower position is normal. If the stream of water is more than this the...

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The Delta shower valve is a very popular valve for home installations. It is one of the most common valves, virtually unchanged over the years.

The inner workings of the Delta valve is a ball with holes that line up with holes in the valve body. Both plastic and stainless steel balls are made, I prefer the stainless steel variety.

On the valve body side, rubber cups are held against the ball with small springs. Your replacement kit may come with a variety of spring shapes. Use the ones that match those that you took out.

1) Identifying the Delta shower valve: Look for a Delta logo. (if yours is a Moen, or Price Pfister, then it is not a Delta) The Delta valve comes in a variety of finishes, but all turn on by pushing the valve handle up. Rotating the handle left and right controls the temperature. Full hot is about 270° of rotation from off. If it's a tub & shower installation you'll have an additional button to select tub or shower operation.

2)...

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Single Control Bath/Shower Valve Identification

K-304-K*-NA or K-305-K*-NA 1/2" Pressure Balancing Valve

Cap has 2 screws that hold it onto the brass valve body

The brass, round, splined stem rotates clockwise to turn on

Part Numbers: Cap GP77759, PBU GP500520, Complete repair kit (includes cap and pbu) GP76851.

K-304-K Service Parts K-305-K Service Parts


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K-11748-K/KS-NA 1/2" Rite Temp Pressure Balancing Valve with Diverter

Cap has 2 screws that hold it onto the brass valve body The brass, round, splined stem rotates clockwise to turn on Push/Pull diverter diverts water from the bottom port outlet to the top port outlet Part Numbers: Cap GP77759, PBU GP500520, Complete repair kit (includes cap & pbu) GP76851, Diverter 1081410...
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A little while back, I was experiencing signs of a worn out valve in my main floor tub/shower. The knob was getting difficult to turn and soon I started noticing evidence of a small leak that was damaging the ceiling of the basement below the valve.

I opened up as much of the plumbing as I could get to through the access panels and confirmed that the valve, not the pipes were leaking. It turns out that the Moen shower valve in the main floor bath uses an easily replacable cartridge insert. In about an hour, including a trip to the neighborhood hardware store for a new cartridge and a new energy efficient water heater (old one was running poorly), my shower valve was repaired and working better than ever.

Here’s how it was done:

Start by turning off the water supply to the tub. Pry the decorative cover from the end of the knob with a straight screwdriver, then unscrew the knob and remove it. With the knob gone, it should now be possible to remove the...

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Описание:

http://www.plumberx.com In this video we start by removing the old two handle tub and shower valve from inside the wall. First we remove the handles and spout leaving the shower head in place to hold up the old shower valve and keeping it there until the new shower valve is in place this makes it easy and keeps use inline with the new installation and makes it very easy to line up the new shower head. Now that we have the handle off its time to go around on the back side and cut into the wall or if were lucky there just may be a trap door on the back side that gives us access to the tub and shower valve from the back side. Once on the back side of the tub and shower valve we start by disconnecting the unions on the old two handle tub and shower valve. Now the part that goes up to the shower head is copper. What we are going to do here is take our torch and heat the solder connection and pull the valve loose from the shower head riser pipe. Now with the old tub and...

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Screwdriver Pliers Adjustable wrench Stem wrench Replacement parts Sketch (optional) Packing nut washer (optional)

Step 1 Turn off the water to the bathtub and shower at the shut-off valve. Let any remaining water flow out of the faucet.

Step 2 Remove the cap and screw from the faucet handle using a screwdriver, and take off the handle and escutcheon.

Step 3 Remove the stop tube and cartridge with pliers if you have a washerless faucet. Washerless faucets use a single knob to control hot and cold water.

Quick Tip:

Make a sketch of how parts fit together as you disassemble them. This will make it easier to reassemble the parts.

Step 4 Remove the valve stem if you have a compression faucet with an adjustable wrench. If the stem is recessed, use a stem...

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Let’s take a look into some of the usually unseen parts of a great shower. In this post we’re going to look at the shower valve and why you might replace it.

Maybe you’ve heard your friend or a plumber talk about a leaking shower valve or that one was required when building a new shower. Ever wondered what the heck are they actually talking about?

When people are talking about a ‘shower valve’ they are usually talking about one of the following;

a pressure balancing valve

a thermostatic valve / thermostatic mixing valve

a diverter valve or a transfer valve

Pressure balancing valves and thermostatic valves are involved in controlling and maintaining the water temperature of your shower. While diverter valves and transfer valves are involved in directing or re-directing the flow of your shower water from the shower head to the tub faucet (or to the hand-held shower head, etc).

Pressure-balancing valve

The most common type of...

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If home inspectors aren’t suspicious by nature, I believe they’ll come to be so after a few years in the business. And this serves us well, especially when confronted with a tiled shower. The perfect example is the shower stall pictured above. At first glance it appears to be typical for its type and age. The strainer is missing; there’s some minor grout deterioration; and the door has been given up for a curtain — all defects, but not necessarily major issues.

But wait, there’s a minor stain at the ceiling below. Did someone leave the curtain out? Or run the toilet over? Or given what I know about tiled showers, does the stain suggest I should be considering more troublesome possibilities?

From experience, I’ve come to believe the difference between a good inspection of a tiled shower and a disastrous one is what we look for, what we ask ourselves, and what inspection techniques we use to answer our own questions.
After all, a tiled shower can be as...

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