Electrical Code question for crawl space

1

I think the question you posed deserves an official answer. Simply because a crawlspace exists, does not automatically qualify it as a damp location.

Further, if the romex simply passes through the space, even it it is damp, should not necessarily cause a problem. As to damp locations, I believe the restriction is more specific, as to the amount of moisture present. And, the truth of the matter is that there are thousands of homes where this cable is installed in damp crawlspaces. The question is whether the crawlspace is simply damp, or actually wet. I also question the question, in its entirety, as the specifies a normally dry location. I do not believe crawlspaces are constructed, nor acceptable, in a normally wet condition.

I agree that damp locations may be problematic for metallic sheathed cabling, from the standpoint of the long-term affect of the moisture on the sheathing. As we know, some metallic sheathed cables have a separate conductor embedded inside...

0 0
2

Controlling Water Vapor Damage

Crawl space is traditionally the most misunderstood part of your home. It encompasses many crucial building components of the foundation. A compromised crawl space endangers the structural integrity of the foundation system. Damage occurs when the environment is moist, exposing joists, sill plate, support beams, subfloor, piers, block foundation walls, etcetera, to undesirable temperatures and water vapor levels.

Before. A moist and damp crawlspace affects the entire home environment and endangers the structural integrity of the foundation system itself, in addition to increasing allergens in the home, providing living space for insects and other pests, etc.


During. The first step to controlling water vapor and seepage is to seal the walls and floor of the crawl space and includes the installment of a vapor barrier in all areas, including the many nooks and crannies, of the crawl space.


After. A clean...

0 0
3

GFCI Outlets In The Kitchen

Countertop Outlets: To protect people working in the kitchen with appliances around water section 210.52(B) of the National Electric Code requires all countertop outlets to be ground-fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protected.

Sink Receptacle: A receptacle must be within 2 feet of the end of the sink.

Receptacle Countertop Seperation: The maximum distance between receptacles over the counter tops is 4 feet, this is measured along the wall not the front of the counter.

Circuits Required In Kitchen: The kitchen, dining room and pantry are required to have a minimum of 2 20-ampere circuits. see our article on Wiring a GFCI Outlet for more information.

Dedicated Circuits: The two kitchen GFCI circuits are each dedicated, meaning that they cannot supply power to anything else except the kitchen outlets.

Kitchen Island: If you have an island it needs to have a outlet on it. If it is large it...

0 0
4

NATIONAL ELECTRICAL CODE

NEC 210.8 Ground-fault Circuit-Interrupter (GFCI) protection shall be provided for all 125-volt, 15 and 20 amp receptacle outlets installed outdoors, in boathouses, garages, unfinished accessory buildings, crawl spaces at or below grade level, unfinished basements, bathrooms, at kitchen countertops and within 6 feet of the outside edge of the sink in laundry rooms, utility rooms, and at wet-bars.

NEC 210.8 Ground-Fault Protection basements, unfinished
At dwellings, ground-fault circuit-interrupter (GFCI) protection shall be provided for all receptacle outlets

NEC 210.8 Ground-Fault Protection bathrooms
At dwellings, ground-fault circuit-interrupter (GFCI) protection shall be provided for all receptacle outlets in bathrooms, garages, crawl spaces, unfinished basements, kitchen countertops, wet-bar sinks, boathouses and outdoors.

NEC 210.8 Ground-Fault Protection boathouses
At dwellings, ground-fault...

0 0
5

Wet Crawl Space

I have a small area measuring 8ft long by 4ft wide and max 1/2 inch deep that is filled with water. This area is not one solid area, it's a combination of many small shallow puddles. Living in a saturated water table of Seattle, I don't think this needs a sump pump because it seems minor. The downspouts are clear. Any suggestions for a remedy?

Can you trench a perforated pipe and feed it on a downward slope to an area away from the house?

I like Ranie's idea best.. no pump .. just a drain to daylight. But if your lot is level... then I would go with a pump. You shouldn't let water set under your house.

Frost Build-up in Cold Cellar

Our house is 9 months old and as the weather has gotten colder, we have noticed frost building up in the cold cellar, which is below the entrance stairs to the house. In the summer, the room was humid. We also noticed the room has no vent. Should the room have a vent and how...

0 0
6

An electrical junction box is a container made out of metal or hard plastic that contains the

wiring

junctions or intersections for electrical connections. These help the wiring in the home or public building interface with the main power supply provided by a local utility. The general purpose of a junction box is to conceal the electrical junctions from sight and to keep them from being tampered with. Here are some of the frequently asked questions answered by Experts regarding junction boxes.

Is having a junction box fitted into the wall a violation of the electric code?

It is not against the code as long as you take care to see that the junction box is not buried behind the sheet rock. You will need to install a blank cover over it as the code dictates that every splice needs to be accessible.

Is there a electrical code that specifies if a junction box is required in a crawl space of a house or can taped wires be left in its place?

It...

0 0
7

Expert: Bob Thompson - 10/18/2006


Question

That seems pretty simple--let me make sure I understand:

Step 1: Take the power from the existing switch and run it to the first outlet.

Step 2: Run a line from the first outlet to the second outlet.

Step 3: Run a line from the second outlet to a switch that controls the unfinished crawl space light.

Step 4: Run a line from the first outlet to a different switch that controls the finished crawl space lights.

Step 5: Run a line from the switch that controls the finished crawl space to the first light.

Step 6: Run a line from the first light to the second light, then to the third light and then finally to the fourth light.

Do I have all that straight?
-------------------------

Followup To

Question -
I want to finish one section (11 x 13) of my crawl space (18 x 13 total) for my kids as an extra play area. Right now it is wired with a switch and two...

0 0
8

If you remove a receptacle in a kitchen that serves the counter top, it must be replaced by a GFCI protected receptacle. The GFCI can be a breaker in the panel. 406.3(D)(2) requires GFCI protected receptacles where replacements are made at receptacle outlets that are required to be so protected elsewhere in the NEC. These receptacles, using existing boxes and wire without a grounding conductor, can be installed without attaching a wire to the green ground screw on the receptacle. The GFCI will still protect people.

The fine print note found in 406.3- FPN No. 2: For extensions of existing branch circuits, see 250.130.

It is important to note that an outlet is any box for using power including lights. GFCI codes generally only refer to receptacles (the things you plug cords into)

Once you gut the kitchen, the new outlets become an extension and not a replacement. These new outlets must conform to the current NEC including the new wire with a grounding conductor...

0 0
9

It can be necessary to seal a crawl space to prevent moisture, pests, and radon gas from entering a home. First, locate any areas in the crawl space that could leak and either seal them or install a pump to remove water. Be sure the door of the crawl space is adequate, replacing it if necessary, and install a vapor barrier on the walls and floor. A vapor barrier can be made from plastic sheeting or concrete. Finally, insulate the crawl space to help provide more efficient heating and cooling of the home.

The first step when you want to seal a crawl space is to repair any existing leaks and seal cracks or holes where insects or water could enter. Areas around plumbing and electrical lines, air vents, ductwork, and cracks in the foundation should be sealed with caulk and expandable foam. Sealing these openings can help to prevent moisture and insects from entering the crawl space.

Sometimes moisture is already present in a crawl space because of groundwater leaking...

0 0
10

Michael Geoghegan is designing a house for a mixed, humid climate and he plans on using an insulated crawl space.

Advanced Energy, a regional energy consulting firm, has published a report on crawl spaces which suggests a dehumidifier can be used as an alternative to providing code-required supply air to condition a crawl space. "I'm a little bit concerned about cold floors in the winter time with this method," Geoghegan writes in a Q&A post at GreenBuildingAdvisor. "Does anyone have any experience here?"

Detailing crawl spaces correctly isn't simple. A recent Q&A Spotlight focused on methods for insulating a crawl space, and Geoghegan's question — "What's the best way of ventilating a sealed crawl space?" — raises overlapping concerns.

In this Q&A Spotlight, the discussion quickly turns to a broader issue: Are crawl spaces a good idea in the first place? Although they are common in the southeastern part of the U.S., they are rarely used in the Northeast, where...

0 0
11

Get an INSTANT, detailed estimate of the cost to Insulate a Crawl Space! Our free calculator uses up-to-date, trusted data to estimate typical subcontractor costs for a Crawl Space Insulation project. For a basic 250 square feet project in zip code 47474, the benchmark cost to Insulate a Crawl Space ranges between $1.08 - $2.47 per square foot* .

To estimate costs for your project:

1. Set Project Zip Code Enter the Zip Code for the location where labor is hired and materials purchased.

2. Specify Project Size Enter the number of "square feet" required for the project.

3. Re-calculate Click the "Update" button.

NOTE: *Input the total of the finished surface area AND the area of any openings enclosed by the finished area.


...
0 0
12

InspectAPedia tolerates no conflicts of interest. We have no relationship with advertisers, products, or services discussed at this website.

This article lists potentially dangerous or un-healthy conditions that should be evaluated by an inspector or worker who is expected to enter, inspect, or work in a crawl space anywhere in a building. The crawl space shown in our page top photo was in our opinion not a readily accessible area. This decision is made by the inspector on the scene, not by anyone else.

Green links show where you are. © Copyright 2015 InspectApedia.com, All Rights Reserved.

Crawl Space Safety for Home Inspectors

Is the crawl space safely accessible, or accessible at all?

A number of conditions besides the old saw "accessibility" or size of the crawl space opening should be considered carefully by the home inspector, electrical inspector, or anyone who is deciding if it is safe to enter an crawl area anywhere in a...

0 0
13
Question: How do I select the correct UnderAire™ Crawl Space Ventilator model for my crawl space? Answer: Calculate the cubic area of the crawl space by multiplying the length Ч width Ч height. Divide this number by 15 to determine the minimum CFM necessary to fully ventilate the space in 15 minutes. Example: 20’ wide Ч 40’ long Ч 3’ high crawl space = 2400 cubic ft. 2400 cubic ft. ч 15 = 160 CFM of ventilation. Choose two V1 or V1D ventilators or one V2D ventilator. Question: Where should I mount the UnderAire™ Crawl Space Ventilator? Answer: Crawl Spaces are usually square, rectangular or L shaped. The UnderAire™ Crawl Space Ventilator should be installed to provide complete ventilation. As air is being vented out of the crawl space, air will be entering in from a foundation vent on the opposite side of the crawl space. The UnderAire™ exhausts stagnant air from the crawl...
0 0
14
There are many today who advocate sealing a crawl space. Even ignoring the very high
cost of such a project, there are serious problems with such a strategy.But the real question
is

“Should You Even Have a Vapor Barrier on The Ground?”

Nearly every home with a crawl space has a vapor barrier on the ground, but is this really
the best methodology? Some moisture inevitably comes from the ground, but most of the
moisture is airborne. To help with this moisture problem the building code has specified a
certain number of passive vents or mechanical (fans) vents for crawl spaces, but there are
significant shortcomings with passive crawl space ventilation. Because of this many now
recommend no ventilation of any kind, not only covering the ground with a vapor barrier,
but also sealing the walls of the crawl space.
But there are several problems with sealing the crawl space and having no ventilation.
The problem is that this...

0 0
15

Installing wooden floor over a crawl space will expose the wood to moisture from the ground and humidity from the air in this area of your home. Eventually, these wooden materials may start to rot, warp, and decay, eventually causing sagging areas on the first level of the home.

The interior wall panels or drywall panels of the home over the crawl space can be effected by crawl space moisture and humidity. The moisture can cause the panels to warp and rot, while the humidity can be a contributing factor to dangerous mold growth on the walls.

This is the outside area of the crawl space that you see from outside of the home. These walls may not show much damage from the outside, but on the inside, they may have mold or efflorescence growing on them and causing problems.

Often times, builders use inferior quality insulating materials inside of the crawl space when it is being built. It is important to have the proper insulation in place to provide a comfortable...

0 0
16
...
0 0
17

Nearly every home with a crawl space has a vapor barrier on the ground, but is this really the best methodology? Some moisture inevitably comes from the ground, but probably most of the moisture is airborne. To help with this moisture problem the building code has specified a certain number of passive vents or mechanical (fans) vents for crawl spaces, but there are significant shortcomings with passive crawl space ventilation. Because of this many now recommend no ventilation of any kind, covering the ground with a vapor barrier, and sealing the walls of the crawl space.

But there are several problems with sealing the crawl space and having no ventilation.

The problem is that this sealed crawl space now becomes a closed, stagnant area that is never cleaned, so it likely will develop odors and other gases from insect killers, termiticides, etc. There occasionally may be dead critters, mice, etc. Any odors, etc. in a closed crawl space will migrate into the...

0 0
18

DEAR TIM: My head is spinning from all of the conflicting information I'm seeing online about crawl space encapsulation. Should it be done or should I just rely on the traditional vents I have in my foundation? I have a 1,100 square-foot crawl space and the slate floor above is ice cold because there's no insulation. What would you do if this were your home and why? - Richard J., Toledo, OH

DEAR RICHARD: I can understand your frustration. While the Internet is an amazing resource, the barrier to entry with respect to publishing is lower than the bottom of Death Valley. If you can fog a mirror and type on a keyboard, you're capable of posting your opinion about how you think things should be done on the Internet.

Back before the Internet, traditional book publishers would do a fairly good job of vetting an author before they agreed to publish his work. This filtering process kept much of the erroneous information out of the mainstream. It was possible to self-publish,...

0 0
19

InspectAPedia tolerates no conflicts of interest. We have no relationship with advertisers, products, or services discussed at this website.

Access to crawl building crawl spaces:

This article describes the accessibility requirements & codes the required size & location for crawl area openings in buildings, the standards & procedures for entering crawl spaces, and we explain how can we inspect a crawl area and building conditions when safe, ready access are not already provided.

Green links show where you are. © Copyright 2015 InspectApedia.com, All Rights Reserved.

How to Get Into a Crawl Space That Has No Ready Access

Watch out: Before entering a crawl space to inspect its condition or to clean up the crawl space or make repairs in the crawl area.

At CRAWL SPACE SAFETY ADVICE we list a variety of reasons not to enter a crawl space. And even if you think the crawl space is not obviously dangerous, limited space or other risks often mean...

0 0