Fridge line to standard pipe

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The picture shows a copper pipe with a compression-fit valve attached. The copper pipe is presumably just a straight section of pipe going into your wall box, and the silver-colored thing with a shutoff knob is a valve attached to the pipe. Are you trying to replace the valve or use the threaded output on the valve itself?

If the existing valve simply has the wrong size output to attach your icemaker line, then the adapter you need is one that takes this valve's male end and adapts it to 1/4" male. If the existing output is a little too wide, then most likely your existing valve is 3/8" (typical for faucet supplies). So you'd need a 3/8" Female to 1/4" Male fitting like this one.

(Note that the linked fitting includes a compression nut that you would simply unscrew and discard for your application - you'd just screw the adapter to your existing valve, and then screw the line to the adapter.)

Another options would be to replace the valve with a similar one that...

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Shannon from http://www.house-improvements.com/kit... shows you how to install a water line to your fridge so you can use its' water and ice dispenser features. If you have any questions about your home DIY projects, stop by the forum on our website and ask. Video © 2014 SKS Media.

Videos produced by SKS Media (House-Improvements.com) are provided for informational purposes only. The information contained in the videos is intended to give general guidance to simplify DIY (do it yourself) projects. Because tools, products, materials, equipment, techniques, building codes and local regulations are constantly changing, SKS Media cannot and does not assume any responsibility or liability for the accuracy of the information contained therein. Further, SKS Media will not accept any claim for liability related to, but not limited to, omissions, errors, injury, damage or the outcome of any project. It is the responsibility of the viewer to ensure compliance with all applicable laws,...

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Plumb the fridge

Soldered connection

The 1/4-in. copper tubing connects to an existing cold water line.

The biggest challenge when running a refrigerator water line is tapping into the cold water pipe and running the 1/4-in. O.D. (outside diameter) flexible copper tubing. You can buy icemaker installation kits at home centers and some hardware stores, but we don’t recommend them. Most contain a saddle valve (which doesn’t meet plumbing code in some regions) and some contain plastic tubing (which can dry, split and leak over time). We recommend more permanent valves and copper tubing for better water flow and reduced risk of leaks, which can cause extensive damage.

To start, locate the cold water source nearest to the refrigerator—perhaps under the kitchen sink, below the floor, in the wall or even in the ceiling. In this kitchen, we ran the new refrigerator water line from under the kitchen sink through cabinets. (Note: We removed the drainpipes to...

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Today we’re sharing a DIY plumbing fix I made to complete the installation of our new refrigerator!

In our last post, I talked about the delivery and installation of our new stainless-steel refrigerator, which includes an ice and water dispenser – something we didn’t have with our old refrigerator.

The professional installers were supposed to hook up a water line for the new fridge, but once they saw our kitchen setup, they realized that it wouldn’t work for connecting the refrigerator’s water line to the sink pipe (which was the only method they were authorized to use). The sink and refrigerator would have to be on the same side of the room, and ours are not.

When we originally ordered the new refrigerator, we’d paid an extra $135 for water line installation labor. After I learned the installers wouldn’t be doing this work, I was luckily able to get this charge removed from our total purchase/installation cost. But that still left me...

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Attaching the Fridge Comp. to the Tank:

For the sake of cost and simplicity, I simply zip tied the unit onto the tank. There is virtually no vibration and no worry about it working itself loose over time. You can choose to create a mounting bracket, for cosmetic reasons, however, if you're like me, it doesn't have to be pretty. It just has to work.

Soldering and shaping the Line:

You may need to solder new line and add fittings to make your connection, however more often than not, you can just recycle what came with the air comp, and the fridge. The line you see in the pic was existing from the air comp and was 1/4" I.D. (internal diameter). The line exiting the comp was 1/4" O.D. (outer diameter, so it was simply a matter of a bit of sanding to make the connection. The rest is simply soldering pipe together much as you would if you were working with plumbing. Just lay some flux paste in the joint, apply heat from the torch then let the solder fill the gap, and...

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The brass colored thingy is the Add-aTee Made by B&K called EZ-Connect

Made by Brasscraft, Wolverine Brass and others.

Disconnect cold water at stop to kitchen faucet, install add-a-tee and then the stop on the branch to run to ice maker. Reconnect the cold water lint to the new outlet (run) of the tee.

Use a 3/8"x1/4" compression union or a SS overbraid line to make final adaptations/connections.

Much easier and faster than cutting in new copper fittings and lets you turn off the water to the icemaker from in the kitchen.

One drawback, if you shut off the water to the sink, you've turned off the water to the icemaker. Use two Add-a-stops to allow independant control of water to sink and...

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INSTALLING A WATER LINE

So you're ready to install a water line? Let us guide you through the process.

Back | Next

STEP 1.

First, find the cold water source nearest the refrigerator-it could be under the kitchen sink, below the floor, in the wall or even in the ceiling.

Back | Next

STEP 2.

Calculate how many feet of 1/4-in. outside diameter flexible copper tubing you'll need. Figure 6 to 8 ft. of extra-coiled tubing behind the fridge so you can pull it out for cleaning. These supplies should be available at your local hardware store.

Back | Next

STEP 3.

Keep the rubber hidden to avoid tube damage. If you need to drill through floors or walls, check for air ducts, electrical wiring, plumbing or other possible hurdles first.

Back | Next

STEP 4.

Then decide which one of three water line connection options you will use: a regular tee fitting that is soldered to an existing cold water line; a compression tee fitting that does not...

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Most refrigerator manufacturers offer models with automatic ice makers and dispensers for cold water built into the refrigerators’ doors. These dispensers offer convenience because they automatically replenish themselves from the household water supply. But they must be connected to the house plumbing. Hookup kits include flexible tubing and compatible fittings to make the connection.

Tubing Sizes

Most flexible copper refrigerator water lines have an outside diameter of 1/4 inch. Most flexible plastic water lines for refrigerators come with outside diameters of either 1/4 inch or 5/16 inch. Check your refrigerator's owner's manual or the manufacturer's website for the recommended size and type of water line for your unit.

Installing Line

Installing a refrigerator water line involves tapping into the household cold water supply line at a point close to the refrigerator. Many water line kits include a saddle-type shutoff valve that pierces the supply...

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INSTALLING A WATER LINE

So you're ready to install a water line? Let us guide you through the process.

STEP 1.

First, find the cold water source nearest the refrigerator-it could be under the kitchen sink, below the floor, in the wall or even in the ceiling.

STEP 2.

Calculate how many feet of 1/4-in. outside diameter flexible copper tubing you'll need. Figure 6 to 8 ft. of extra-coiled tubing behind the fridge so you can pull it out for cleaning. These supplies should be available at your local hardware store.

STEP 3.

Keep the rubber hidden to avoid tube damage. If you need to drill through floors or walls, check for air ducts, electrical wiring, plumbing or other possible hurdles first.

STEP 4.

Then decide which one of three water line connection options you will use: a regular tee fitting that is soldered to an existing cold water line; a compression tee fitting that does not require soldering; or a saddle valve that pierces the water line when screwed into...

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