How can I attach pony wall to surface of platform and will it be strong enough against lateral forces?

1

by

Steven

Last Updated February 18, 2016 01:09 AM

I have a loft area to which I want to add a pony wall for safety. My plan is to drywall its inside and outside faces, all the way down across the beam. Can I built it on the surface of the platform safely? I would prefer to avoid attaching the posts to the front of the beam because it would make drywalling more difficult, and I want to use the posts located at the corner as an anchor for some storage that should all appear flush. The beam is 5 1/8" wide so putting it inside the beam, against a joist, leaves too large a distance on the outside edge.

Here are some researched suggestions:

Built pony wall and lag-bolt the corner post through an angle bracket, down through the pony wall's bottom plate and into the beam. Can I lag-bolt 4x4 posts to a 2x4 bottom plate from the bottom, which is then lag bolted through the subfloor and into the beam? Extend plywood down the pony-wall onto the beam to provide...
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I have a loft area to which I want to add a pony wall for safety. My plan is to drywall its inside and outside faces, all the way down across the beam. Can I built it on the surface of the platform safely? I would prefer to avoid attaching the posts to the front of the beam because it would make drywalling more difficult, and I want to use the posts located at the corner as an anchor for some storage that should all appear flush. The beam is 5 1/8" wide so putting it inside the beam, against a joist, leaves too large a distance on the outside edge.

Here are some researched suggestions:

Built pony wall and lag-bolt the corner post through an angle bracket, down through the pony wall's bottom plate and into the beam. Can I lag-bolt 4x4 posts to a 2x4 bottom plate from the bottom, which is then lag bolted through the subfloor and into the beam? Extend plywood down the pony-wall onto the beam to provide strength across the entire face without adding too much thickness. Use a...
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well the suns gravity does get weaker the further we are from it. But that is not the reason why orbits are elliptical.

First of all, you have to think of the right kind of ellipses. We are NOT talking about a "symmetrical" ellipse with the sun in the middle and the earth going equally far out at both ends.

Instead, imagine an ellipse like this.

Now to the reason why orbits look that way. Imagine you fire a cannon paralell to earth surface. You will expect that the ball will fly horizontally but will eventually fall down to earth due to gravity.

But if you load the cannon with more gunpowder, the ball will go further, because it had a higher velocity and could cover more ground in the time it took to fall to the ground. BUT because it travelled a longer distance the earth curved away underneath the ball, just like this. This means the ball would cover a larger distance that you would expect on a flat earth.

If you would launch the ball with just...

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You have the total weight right, but you still aren't getting the lateral force right. At a given depth, the pressure on the wall at that point is:
[tex]P = \rho g h[/tex]

Where:
[itex]P[/itex] is pressure (force per area)
[itex]\rho[/itex] is density (mass per volume)
[itex]g[/itex] is the acceleration due to gravity (length per time per time)
[itex]h[/itex] is depth (length)

You have to make sure that since you insist on using Imperial units, that your units remain consistent. If you are taking your density in pounds per cubic foot, that is essentially the [itex]\rho g[/itex] term.

Now, that gives you the pressure at a given depth. Force is pressure times area, but you know that the pressure varies with depth, so you have to integrate through the depth to get the total force.

[tex]dF = P\;dA = P\;dx\;dh[/tex]

Where:
[itex]dA[/itex] is a differential area
[itex]dx[/itex] and [itex]dh[/itex] are differential lengths that...

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