How can I figure out exactly where a bathroom leak is coming from?

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There's a small amount of water at the lowest point on my bathroom floor. It looks clear and doesn't have a smell. Lately, it's been showing up every day, whether anyone's taken a shower or not.

How can I be absolutely sure where this water is coming from?

A few sources come to mind:

The base of the toilet. The supply line feeding the toilet. The sink across the room. A leak in the roof somewhere over the bathroom.

Overall, the house is of...unusual quality. No one's exactly sure when it was built. On the one hand, the interior is all fairly new. On the other hand, there are knotholes in the exterior walls that were "repaired" by having a tin can lid tacked on over them.* Bottom line: I'd believe just about anything could be the source of this water.

*Surprisingly, you'd never notice the tin can lids unless you were really paying...

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by

Joe

Last Updated March 02, 2016 04:09 AM

There's a small amount of water at the lowest point on my bathroom floor. It looks clear and doesn't have a smell. Lately, it's been showing up every day, whether anyone's taken a shower or not.

How can I be absolutely sure where this water is coming from?

A few sources come to mind:

The base of the toilet. The supply line feeding the toilet. The sink across the room. A leak in the roof somewhere over the bathroom.

Overall, the house is of...unusual quality. No one's exactly sure when it was built. On the one hand, the interior is all fairly new. On the other hand, there are knotholes in the exterior walls that were "repaired" by having a tin can lid tacked on over them.* Bottom line: I'd believe just about anything could be the source of this water.

*Surprisingly, you'd never notice the tin can lids unless you were really paying attention.

Answers 1

I see this problem...

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I haven't tried this before but smoke from your favorite incense may help or if you smoke, fire up a few and go hunting.

Remember the following which can make matters worse.

Are you running an exhaust fan on a range, bathroom vent, or a clothes dryer? The air that goes out these vents is replaced with air from the outside. Even a gas water heater or furnace needs air for combustion.

If your walls are not well insulated, the air in a room can cool which makes it denser when it is near the wall. This can cause some air movement without any outside infiltration. Feel your walls. Are they cold?

Remember that an air leak near the ceiling would be an escape for hot air and can cause a draft effect for your air leaks in lower places. This leak may be through acoustic tile that doesn't have a vapor barrier. It can be a hard leak to find since it can be spread over a large area.

If you have central heating duct work, check for leaks in the attic. This can cause...

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Your code looks good! There aren't any memory leaks in what you've shown. If you want, you can declare theDict like this:

theDict = [[[NSMutableDictionary alloc] init] autorelease];

Calling "autorelease" will add the object to the autorelease pool, and it will be automatically released once your function has executed. It's handy - because you don't have to remember to call release. Either way will work here - though.

Does your app leak each time you call this function, or just the first time? If Instruments doesn't show you a line of code where the leak originates, odds are it's just something in the system. In my experience, a few small leaks happen every so often from random system issues.

EDIT:

A leak of this size shouldn't cause any instability in your app. When you're looking for memory leaks, you want to watch out for:

Leaks involving large chunks of memory (NSData or NSImage objects, etc...) Leaks inside loops, or in functions called...
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Have you ever gone downstairs in the morning, ready to start your day, just to discover what appears to be Niagara Falls-esque leak coming from your ceiling? After further inspection, you realize that the origin of the leak is coming from your bathroom. Not sure what to do from here? Don’t worry, this problem can often times be fixed without the help of a professional.

What Do Ceiling Leaks Look Like?

Ceiling leaks from upstairs bathrooms may present themselves as slowly expanding damp spots making their way across your ceiling, or they may present as continuous and steady drips. Either one is serious and demands immediate attention. Before you move on to fixing the leak, the first thing you’ll have to figure out is what’s causing the leak. Persistent leaks that have been there a long time can turn into sagging ceilings, which in turn can turn into a ceiling collapse. You could also end up dealing with a pervasive mold issue if you don’t take care of the issue right...

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@Sunny2, what a temptation to reply with a romantic fiction. But no, in actuality it’s because an acquaintance whom I don’t know very well (and feel a little put off by) mentioned that he now lives exactly halfway around the world from his birthplace. Since I’m curious about where he’s from but haven’t felt like asking, I figured that I could find out by computing what’s halfway around the globe from our present locale. And Iran would be a logical answer.

When I was about 8 or 9, I did persuade the neighborhood kids that we could dig a hole to China. We all thought that sounded exciting, and so we made a great start, right beneath a big old oak tree. Suddenly we encountered an angry red claw reaching up for us. “It’s the devil’s hand!” I screamed. “Quick, fill the hole!” What a heart-pounder that was. Narrow escape! We never tried it...

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If the ceiling's going to leak in any finished room of the house, it might as well be the bathroom. After all, this is one area that's used to water. But enough of this foolish positive thinking. Your ceiling has sprung a leak and that's never a good thing. So now what do you do? First, you identify what's causing the leak, including confirming that it really is a leak. Then, if necessary, you call the appropriate pro to help you solve the problem. Now go get a flashlight and let's get started.

Are You Sure It's a Leak?

Not to insult your intelligence or suggest alarmist behavior, but sometimes what appears to be a bathroom ceiling leak is really a big condensation problem. If you're finding droplets of water in more than one place and you don't have -- or don't use -- a bathroom vent fan (that noisy thing that alerts everyone to enter the bathroom with caution), you might have too much moisture that's simply collecting on the ceiling surface. The water or water marks...

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This story appears in the December 2012 issue of Entrepreneur. Subscribe »

Q: How can you determine exactly what it is your customers want?

A: This sounds like a no-brainer, right? Wrong. You'd be surprised to learn how many entrepreneurs lurch around, oblivious to their customers' deepest desires. How is this possible? Easy. The entrepreneurs forget to ask. Or they ask the wrong questions. Or they rely on their sales force to enlighten them, and the sales force asks the wrong questions. That's where Jaynie L. Smith comes in.

Smith is co-author of Relevant Selling and CEO of Smart Advantage, a Fort Lauderdale, Fla.-based marketing consultant to clients such as Kraft Foods and Zurich Insurance Group. Her company works with a research firm to conduct double-blind surveys to figure out what companies think their customers want vs. what those customers really want. (Double-blind? Customers don't know who's asking the questions, and companies don't know who's...

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Clueless new homeowners here. After a shower and a use of the toilet upstairs, water started dripping through a screw on the track lighting in the kitchen. It started maybe 10 minutes afterwards and lasted maybe 10 minutes, maybe a cup or so of water total, then stopped. What happened? What do we do now? Call a plumber, presumably, but how urgent? An electrician too? Is there danger because of the light fixture?

Presumably we call a plumber, right? Does it need to be tomorrow or can it wait a bit? It would be easier to take time off work later this week, or one of us has Friday the 31st off which would be even better. Is there danger of mold, or structural damage, or anything else, if we wait a bit? Or is it okay since it was only a little water and it's over now (and we'll stop using that bathroom until it's fixed so presumably it won't recur)?

Is there any danger regarding the light fixture? Does the fact that it came through the screw holding up the track and not...

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qwerty1
Post 143

Help! I found a bunch of little black ants all over my nightstand the other night. I immediately grabbed the windex, because that's all I had, and sprayed them down. And the carpet around it. Then I open the drawer and they were all over inside so I sprayed everything in it. I pulled the drawer out and dumped it in my bathtub and sprayed anything I saw moving. There were cough drops in the drawer that my husband had left in there.

I had pulled my bed away from my wall, stripped my bed down, and sprayed Windex on the floor behind the nightstand. It seemed to be okay, but I slept in the guest room that night.

The

next day, I went to Home Depot as I see more randomly on the wall and on the nightstand, they sold me Terro liquid ant bait traps. They said it would attracted a lot more, but in two or three days, they would be gone.

I set one down in the corner where the baseboard meets...

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Assuming you have not used the sprinkler system for some days, then that would rule out a broken pipe from that.

Take a good closeup smell - if it is septic/sewage water you will know it by smell, plus grass usually grows like crazy and turns lush dark green. Then have your septic tank/leach field checked, or sewer pipe (if on city sewer) run with a color camera by a sewer and drain cleaning contractor to check for breaks.

Assuming is clean water with no sewer smell and not making the grass grow like crazy, then if you have a street meter, turn off all water consumption in the house and check the water meter reading - then again an hour or more later if not moving initially, to see if showing consumption. Of course, no one can use any water or flush or anything in that timeframe.

If no movement on meter, then start thinking wet spots are from french drain outlet, or water seeping downhill from a neighbor, unless your area water table is high.

If still...

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