How can I fix a deadlatch with electric strike that will not retract when closing the door?

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I have an Era deadlatch rim lock (standard front door "yale lock") which closes into an electric strike of unknown brand. The latch is the quarter circle shape rather than triangle shape. When closing the door, the latch does not retract when it hits the strike - it just bashes against it, the contact point being about the midpoint of the curved part of the latch, or maybe slightly closer to the door than the midpoint. I have to use the handle to retract the latch and close the door.

The electric strike does not have any other components attached such as an additional faceplate - the latch directly hits the movable part of the strike.

How can I fix this?

p.s. The door opens OK, both with the key and by pressing the buzzer that operates the...

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You may have a deadlocking latch bolt, which in addition to a normal door latch has a plunger. When this plunger is retracted (which happens when the door is closed), the spring loaded mechanism on the latch is disabled. This prevents someone from using the credit card trick to open the door from the outside, so the only way to open the door is by unlocking it and turning the knob. In other words, it's for security.

Sample image from doorware.com, no affiliation

My guess, assuming this is an external locking door, is that this plunger is either jammed or some of the internal mechanisms that it activates have jammed. You can unscrew the door knob and remove both sides, then unscrew the latch and pull it out of the door. From there, try some lubricant (silicone spray and graphite powder are my preferred lubricants for locks, WD-40 will quickly dry and attract dirt). And if it still doesn't work, it's probably time to go to the store to pickup a new...

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I just installed a standard deadlatch, very much like this:

The problem is, it can be opened from the outside with a credit card.

Of course, a properly installed deadlatch should make this impossible. When the deadlatch is depressed, the latch should not be able to retract.

But when I hold the deadlatch down with my thumb and wiggle the latch, the latch eventually retracts.

It has nothing to do with how the strike plate is installed or positioned on the door. I can do it without ever involving the door or strike plate. I can just use my hands. It's very repeatable. Just hold the deadlatch down, press and wiggle the latch, and it retracts, every time.

Does this mean I have a faulty deadlatch? How could a deadlatch malfunction in this way?

UPDATE: I have to use a latching lock for this door. That's part of the users' requirements. So a deadbolt is not an option. Covering the gap between the door and frame might be a good idea for...

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First off, I make no warranty of any of these suggestions. Especially if this is actually a bank...

I would be hesitant to completely rely on an all-electronic solution, since if there is a failure (which, frankly, is likely with a budget of only 200 per lock), you don't want to have to resort to a plasma torch or something to cut open (and destroy) the door to get in.

What seems like an interesting option to me though would be some of the RF-controlled keyless locks on the market. These look like a normal deadbolt, but have an RF remote.

What would be needed in whatever is chosen is the ability to hook into it, specifically, you need two things:

The ability to remotely control lock/unlock The ability to sense if it's locked or unlocked

I'm going to assume that you have some type of microcontroller running the rest of this setup. You didn't specify.. but presumably you have something that has some I/O on it, the ability to connect it to the...

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Today I discovered that the latch on the door from our house into the garage wouldn’t retract (spring back) when it hit the strike plate. When I swung it shut, the latch banged off the strike plate. Thus, I had to turn the knob to close the door.

Bummer. The door locks and handlesets in our house are all Schlage, and they’re not particularly cheap. Thus, I wasn’t crazy about the prospect of buying a new one.

I started by removing the two screws from the flange under the inside knob. This allowed me to pull the two knobs apart and expose the latch mechanism inside.

I then removed the two screws from the plate surrounding the latch (on the edge of the door) which allowed me to pull the latch out. After playing with it for awhile, soaking it down with WD-40, etc. but I couldn’t get it to work.

Frustrated, I headed to the hardware store.

Fortunately, I found that you can buy new latch mechanisms for Schlage (and Kwikset, etc.) handlesets. Thus, I was...

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@Brainii: The lock you pictured above displays a rebated strike plate. Are your double doors rebated? (a step on the edge of each door that creates a seal when the doors are closed)

When looking at the outside of the doors (when closed), is the gap at the top of the doors (both sides) wider near the middle (latch side) than the edge of the doors closer to the hinges?

I would suggest embedding the top hinges slightly deeper into the jamb and at the same time shim the bottom hinges. This will likely make the doors sit straight. If you use long screws to attach the hinges to the studs as suggested previously, the doors will not move in future (unless there's an earthquake...lol) due to the weathering effect.

You could also take a slight bit off the door edge with a plain too. using the tips already provided, it is likely that the issue will be resolved, at least for a few years.

I have used this method for many doors around the world with rarely any...

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1. Access control – Security, access control is the selective restriction of access to a place or other resource. The act of accessing may mean consuming, entering, or using, permission to access a resource is called authorization. Locks and login credentials are two mechanisms of access control. Geographical access control may be enforced by personnel, or with a such as a turnstile. There may be fences to avoid circumventing this access control, an alternative of access control in the strict sense is a system of checking authorized presence, see e. g. Ticket controller. A variant is exit control, e. g. of a shop or a country, the term access control refers to the practice of restricting entrance to a property, a building, or a room to authorized persons. Physical access control can be achieved by a human, through means such as locks and keys. Within these environments, physical key management may also be employed as a means of managing and monitoring access to mechanically keyed...

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ABLE_1 said:

>Strange, I just installed one of these 1006 units and don't recall that
>being possible. When the solenoid is energized it will release the strike
>so it will swing open. I don't remember a rear capture portion moving with
>the strike. As I recall it was a just the front strike portion that moved
>and was spring loaded to return to home position. If it can do what you
>indicate that would be a great strike to use.

I've actually done this on many occasions, so I'm not just reading crap out
of a catalog. What you need to keep in mind about the 1006 strike is that
there are a ton of options available. You're right that the standard
strike is spring-loaded. But you can order faceplate kits to change that,
or order the strike with either the E option or one of the A options,
depending on whether you want to release a cylindrical deadbolt or a
mortise deadbolt. In this configuration, the strike is no longer
...

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Electric strike with monitoring contact.

An electric strike is an access control device used for doors. It replaces the fixed strike faceplate often used with a latchbar (also known as a keeper). Like a fixed strike, it normally presents a ramped surface to the locking latch allowing the door to close and latch just like a fixed strike would. However, an electric strike's ramped surface can, upon command, pivot out of the way when the lock on the door is in the locked position and the door is opened, allowing a user to open the door without operating the mechanical lock or using a mechanical key. After the door is opened past the keeper, the keeper returns to its standard position and re-locks when power is removed or applied, depending upon the strike's configuration.

Electric strikes are generally available in two configurations:

Fail-secure. Also called fail-locked or non-fail safe. In this configuration, applying electric current to the strike will cause it...
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by

Tom

Last Updated May 04, 2017 19:21 PM

I just installed a standard deadlatch, like this (although it's not a Schlage):

The problem is, it can be opened from the outside with a credit card.

Of course, a properly installed deadlatch should make this impossible. When the deadlatch is depressed, the latch should not be able to retract.

But when I hold the deadlatch down with my thumb and wiggle the latch, the latch eventually retracts.

It has nothing to do with how the strike is installed or positioned on the door. I can do it without ever involving the door or strike. I can just use my hands. It's very repeatable. Just hold the deadlatch down, press and wiggle the latch, and it retracts, every time.

Does this mean I have a faulty...

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As time passes, door knobs and locks tend to wear out and have problems. One problem you may notice is that you door latch won’t retract. A lock that does not work can be a big problem, so you will want to fix this immediately. There are a few reasons why a door latch won’t retract, and there are a few ways to fix the problem.

Reasons Why a Door Latch Won’t Retract

One possible problem is that the latch has fallen into the strike hole and gotten stuck. The friction can make the latch unable to retract. If this is the problem, you can try to fix it by closing the door and closing the handle of the knob simultaneously. If that does not work, you can try picking the door up off the ground while turning the lock.

Another possible problem that could cause your door latch to not retract, is that the latch may have completely come off the knob. In order to fix this problem, you will have to completely take the lock off of the door and open it with a...

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Electric strikes are one of the most common types of lock hardware used with card access control systems.

Frequently, electric strikes are used with "cylindrical locks", sometimes called "knob locks". These locks are similar to the type that most people have on their doors at home. One common problem that occurs when cylindrical locks are used with electric strikes is that the "deadlatch" fails...

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Inputs

Power Input

With very few exceptions, most automatic door openers require an external power source. For both of the above examples and the vast majority of commercial grade products on the market, the input voltage is 120-volt house current.

Actuator Input

Usually power operators come with two inputs for actuators anticipating that users will be activating the power operator from either side when they are coming in or going out. That is why most of the time two actuators are specified for each power operator. The most common exception to this is when the exterior actuator is an access control – keypad, key switch, card reader, etc. Another exception is when a request-to-exit switch placed inside an exit device acts as the actuator upon egress. Still another exception is when a passive infrared motion detector is used as an actuator. Anything that can be used to momentarily close a set of open electrical dry contacts can be used as an...

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My dishwasher door will not close! Here are the top reasons why your dishwasher door will not latch or close. The 5 parts listed are the parts that will need to be inspected to see if they are damaged. If any dishwasher door parts are bent, broke, or faulty, your dishwasher door will not shut, close, or latch properly. The parts below are the parts that most every dishwasher has to assist in closing the door properly.

Dishwasher Door Will Not Close or Latch – How To Fix?

HINT 1: Before checking any parts on the dishwasher door, check to be sure that the dishes on the racks do not protrude out past the front of the dishwasher rack. If there are items sticking out, the dishwasher door will not close. Rearrange items in the dishwasher so that they do not block the door from closing.

HINT 2: Another simple fix could be that the dishwasher door is hitting the installation cabinet or the screws holding it in place. Check to be sure the door is not hitting the cabinet...

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An electric strike is an access control device used for doors. It replaces the fixed strike faceplate often used with a latchbar (also known as a keeper). Like a fixed strike, it normally presents a ramped surface to the locking latch allowing the door to close and latch just like a fixed strike would. However, an electric strike's ramped surface can, upon command, pivot out of the way when the lock on the door is in the locked position and the door is opened, allowing a user to open the door without operating the mechanical lock or using a mechanical key. After the door is opened past the keeper, the keeper returns to its standard position and re-locks when power is removed or applied, depending upon the strike's configuration.

Electric strikes are generally available in two configurations:

Fail-secure. Also called fail-locked or non-fail safe. In this configuration, applying electric current to the strike will cause it to unlock. In this configuration, the strike would...
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