How to fix the slant of bathroom floor

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This is a follow up question to How long does caulk need to dry in a 1" gap?

Some additional background information is that this is in China and bathrooms are not designed for contained bathtubs/showers but generally slant all the floor tiles towards a single drain. Many households have no shower stall and allow shower water to spray everywhere in the bathroom. After a shower they mop or squeegee the water towards the drain.

We have a glass shower stall but because of the slope of the floor it doesn't lie flat. There is a large gap on one side where the floor slants to allow water from the entire bathroom to flow towards the drain. I've been having trouble keeping the shower water from washing away the caulk placed over this gap (see previous question for a picture and details).

I'm pretty sure now that the solution is to fix the floor slope so that water doesn't pool up and wash away the caulk. How should I do that?

Here's a picture of the water pooling...

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I hope others have ideas for you as mine isn't ideal. A PO of our 1920s style-free expanded miner's shack (not all old houses are attractive and well built, folks; some are just old) apparently shifted a load bearing wall as part of a 1970s remuddling. That wall had supported the main beam for the second storey. Oops.

Over the years the joists supporting the second storey began to pull away from that beam and a huge crack opened up in the living room ceiling. The PO right before us had simply filled that crack with spackle! Within months of moving in the crack reopened, of course. We'd already noted the sagging floor above. When we dug into the ceiling and saw close to an inch of gap between joists and beam, we knew why we had some sagging.

The only sure cure our contractor could come up with was a large brace to stand in for the missing wall. It runs from rear of dining room to front of living room, and is built up of triple 2x6 lumber with drywall covering it. It's...

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Ceramic...

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A shed is indispensable outbuilding on a farm and in a garden area. Seasonal storage of tools and materials can be left here for a short-term. Advanced gardeners equip in sheds even a comfortable bathroom and shower stall. In short, with a shed existence, the use of it in any case can be found. The purpose of this construction is strictly utilitarian, so the outward appearance does not need many requirements, the main thing - ease of use and building. So, let’s talk about how to build a slanted shed roof without a lot of effort.

Required tools

This covering type requires a minimum number of construction materials and it is still the simplest method for execution. This design, like other types of coatings, should be made with the use of wood as the basic material. It is taken as a basis for rafters and beams and other necessary elements. The coating material for a slanted shed roof can be varied: slate, metal tiles, shingle, and others.

Each item has a feature,...

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One of the most common complaints of old-house owners is sagging floors. In my own house, for example, every floor pitches toward the center stairwell. Although generally only an annoyance, sagging floors can be an indication of worsening problems. Here's a quick review of the most common problems and a few of the typical remedies.

Investigate the Problem

Typically, floors settle near the center of the house because the perimeter walls are constructed over a sound, deep foundation and settle very little. Major support beams within this perimeter, though, are often supported by makeshift posts.

If your house is built over a basement, first inspect all of the basement support beams and posts where they meet the floor. Be suspicious of wood posts set on dirt floors or wood posts with concrete poured around the post bases. As the posts slowly rot and melt into the floor, the house settles accordingly, bottom to top. As a test, firmly push a metal probe or...

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By Mark J. Donovan

Screwing it into the wall will leave the appearance of a floating front on the vanity, so that won’t work. I have toyed with the idea of adding some wood under the front feet but that would leave the full side with a slanted appearance on the side (not the worst choice because it wouldn’t be very visible).

Anyway, I was wondering if you had any ideas for me to try. My wife was SOOO excited to see the remodeled bathroom…then I installed the bathroom vanity. Please help! Matthew

First, as you suggested you could build a small platform to install the bathroom vanity on. This is not the worst of situations and if done tastefully, using fancy molding for example, it could look rather nice.

The second idea that comes to mind is to cut off a portion of the backside of the bathroom vanity along the base of it, such that is follows the contour of the uneven concrete floor. This would bring the feet down to the level of the floor on the front....

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There are several problems that can cause a sagging or sloping floor, which is one of the reasons why fixing a sloping floor is difficult. Foundation issues, deteriorating wood supports (especially sills, which rest on the foundation footer), improperly installed joists or sub-floors, and other issues can all cause a floor to slope or sag. In many cases, fixing a sloping floor is an expensive and lengthy operation. It might also be difficult to find the right company to do the job.

Many older homes have problems with sloping and sagging floors. In a lot of cases, the owners of these homes simply ignore the problem or pass it off as a normal part of having a classic house. Though a sloped floor might indeed bring some character to a house, some of the issues that can cause them can lead to other problems down the road. If your home has floors that are sloped and sagging, it’s a good idea to have a professional evaluate what, if anything, needs to be done.

Identifying...

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Ceiling fans are a great way to keep cool in the summer and warm in the winter if you know how to use them properly. Though there is much confusion on the subject, it’s not that hard as long as you remember two simple rules.

Rule #1: Summer

Run ceiling fans counterclockwise on medium to high speeds during hot weather only when the room is occupied.

Ceiling fans make you feel cooler in the summer by creating an artificial breeze that evaporates moisture from your skin. This allows you to set your thermostat higher, saving money on air conditioning bills.

When a ceiling fan rotates counterclockwise (while looking up at it), the slant of the blades pushes air down, causing a noticeable breeze. The faster the fan spins, the cooler you feel.

This cooling effect doesn’t change the temperature of the air, it only makes you feel cooler. That is why you should turn the fan off when the room is empty. Otherwise, heat from the motor will...

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What should I do about the Slippery bathroom Floor?

A slippery bathroom floor can be a health and safety issue.

A slip or a fall in a bathroom can have a disastrous outcome, particularly for the elderly or a sole occupant in a dwelling.

The slippery bathroom floor may be a result of:

The floor tiles have a glazed surface finish and they have always been slippery The floor used to be ok, but has become slippery over time.

Let’s look at that glazed tile surface a little closer.

These glazed ceramic floor tiles may be 50mm x 50mm square, with the slightly curved edges, combined with the closeness of the grout lines; they have gained some surface unevenness, which gives a small amount of slip restiveness.

However this floor may be more slippery than it was in years past. This could be caused by a build-up of soap residue or other contaminates like body fat or talcum powder that does not get removed with the normal cleaning process.


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How to Fix a Slippery Bathroom Floor, Tiles or Vinyl

What should I do about the Slippery bathroom Floor?

A slippery bathroom floor can be a health and safety issue.

A slip or a fall in a bathroom can have a disastrous outcome, particularly for the elderly or a sole occupant in a dwelling.

The slippery bathroom floor may be a result of:

The floor tiles have a glazed surface finish and they have always been slippery The floor used to be ok, but has become slippery over time.

Let’s look at that glazed tile surface a little closer.

These glazed ceramic floor tiles may be 50mm x 50mm square, with the slightly curved edges, combined with the closeness of the grout lines; they have gained some surface unevenness, which gives a small amount of slip restiveness.

However this floor may be more slippery than it was in years past. This could be caused by a build-up of soap residue or other contaminates like body fat or talcum powder that does...

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A shower should have a removable access panel, sometimes located in the room behind the shower wall, but tub drains, shower drains and the main drainpipe to which all fixture drains attach are often accessible only from beneath. If you’ve eliminated all other causes of leaks, the next step is to cut out a small access hole in the ceiling below. Cut out the section of ceiling drywall where you see the evidence of the leak. If a drainpipe connection is directly above, you’re in luck.

Unfortunately, water can travel down a sloping drainpipe and then drip at a low point. If the leak is not right above the wet spot, you might have to cut out more of the ceiling drywall, following the drainpipe upward, until you find the leaking...

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Fixing a leak You should first check fan vent outlet on roof - should have a flapper of some kind that may be stuck open or have a hole in it. If it only leaks when it is raining that is first clue. One other possibility is the vent pipe is running through cold attic causing condensation - you can wrap vent pipe with insulation to solve that one . Shorten distance of fan vent, too much condensation to evaporate before running back to fan.

More input from FAQ Farmers:

It isn't possible to fix a leak unless you know where the leak is coming from. It could be from the bath, basin, radiator, toilet. We need more information.

Fix the bathtub water valve first, since you know it is broken. If you have a plumber do this, he may be able to diagnose what is happening with the fan. Recently, we found that the condensation pipe was plugged, and we got a leak--the water always finds a...

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Our situation is as described in the subject line: our 1st & 2nd floors always seem to have different temperatures - in the winter the 2nd floor is always colder, in the summer it's always hotter.

Assuming I have limited funds and could only afford one modification, what would be the best/quickest/cheapest way to fix? Re-zoning the heating/cooling system? Adding insulation to walls & roof? Adding more heating/cooling vents? Something else?

Details if that helps: We have gas heating & central AC in one unit conditioning the whole (1100 sqft) house. There is one vent per room but much more airflow on the first floor. We have a cape (slanted celings and all), 2nd floor is 2 BRs and a bath connected by a tiny hallway.

We need insulation installed and I'm sure that will make a difference but I was wondering if re-zoning or another mod to the heating system might give us more bang for our buck, even if it's less energy efficient.

Thanks.

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Slippery bathroom floors can cause major problems for many people especially elderly men and women. When a bathroom floor is slippery, a person can fall and hurt themselves severely.

The elderly or even a child can fall and hit their heads or break a hip bone if the fall is severe enough. Preventing slippery bathroom floors is essential in protecting your loved ones from becoming injured due to a fall. And since the costs of fixing a slippery bathroom is minimal, there should be little reason to delay.

Bathroom Shower Mats

There are equipment and supplies that one can purchase to help prevent things like this from happening. Shower mats are a great accessory to add to your bathroom. When exiting from the bathtub, you will be able to dry off on the shower mat. Keep any dripping water there instead of getting it on your floors and creating a slippery situation. There are even some shower mats that can be placed in the bathtub to prevent slippery situations while...

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Sound produced from flooring comes from movement between pieces of subfloor or between the subfloor and joists. The answer is to find what's moving and stop it. Typical tile floors have 3/4 inch plywood attached to the joists with a 1/4 inch smooth surface like sheet luan over that.

If you are able to temporarily remove the tile, screw (not nail) the subfloor down at 4 inch intervals in both directions and replace the tile.

If the top layer cannot be temporarily removed, you will have to wait until the top layer can be replaced. If the luan top layer is replaced also, it's worth the effort to apply beads of construction glue between the two layers before screwing the floor down to the 3/4 inch.

The above is assuming you have some kind of flexible vinyl tile. If the tile was a rigid tile like ceramic, slate etc., your problem would be cracked tiles or cracked grout. An under-floor has to be totally stable like a concrete slab to accept that kind of...

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MOUNTING GUIDELINES

ADA Mirror Requirements

Note: The source for the information below is the 2010 ADA Standards for Accessible Design.

Mirrors - Mirrors located above lavatories or countertops shall be installed with the bottom edge of the reflecting surface 40 inches (1015 mm) maximum above the finish floor or ground. Mirrors not located above lavatories or countertops shall be installed with the bottom edge of the reflecting surface 35 inches (890 mm) maximum above the finish floor or ground.

A single full-length mirror can accommodate a greater number of people, including children. In order for mirrors to be usable by people who are ambulatory and people who use wheelchairs, the top edge of mirrors should be 74 inches (1880 mm) minimum from the floor or...

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The following bathroom walls sheetrock tips will show you how to install a new bathtub/shower unit correctly, and also how to permanently fix one that just keeps cracking.

NEW CONSTRUCTION: When tub/shower units and the surrounding drywall are improperly installed, it s very common to see cracking where the wall meets the tub/surround. You can caulk it all you want, but it just keeps cracking and the caulk just won t cure it. The result is an ugly build-up of old caulking from repeated attempts to solve the problem.

The two most common causes are:

#1 Using the wrong fasteners to install the tub/shower unit:
Always use screws on the flange of the tub unit. DO NOT USE NAILS . Always shim the flange if needed.

#2 Most people place the drywall over-top of the flange on the tub/surround unit:
This creates a space between the drywall and the nearby studs. As a result, this cracking is often accompanied by nail pops near the same area.

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Well I have only had one pest and building inspection done on all the buildings I purchased. I already knew there was a water leak in the roof. A leak at the entrance way. When I got the report it said all was well basically and they had pages of exclusions that meant basically "all care and no responsibility". It did not cover any electrical, plumbing, structural, foundations, termite activity not visible, asbestos, mould etc. A 35 page report and I would say about 30 pages were just toilet paper. I did not have a Better Peace Of Mind from it!

I then went and found they had broken tiles on the roof while walking around as well. All for $800. I found the water leaks myself and fixed them. Their report did not cover that the garage ceiling was dropping (which was quite obvious to anyone)The report said the house had an open fires with chimneys (wrong!). They did not pick up the obvious missing aluminium bay window mouldings, the roller door incorrectly aligned.

If I...

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