Is this 110v 1hp motor reversible by swapping leads?

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It is that easy. You will need a motor of the same frame size, same output shaft size and same speed...unless you wish to do a bit more cobbling.

For about the same money, if you have 230 volt available in your shop, you could purchase a VFD, variable frequency drive, that would convert your 230 volt service to 230 volt 3-phase for your present motor. As a word of caution, there are several types of VFDs out there and you will want a single phase in, 3-phase out model.

Staying with a 3-phase motor and a VFD has several advantages. You will have a range of variable speed via variations in the selected hertz rating. A 3-phase motor will give you a smoother more precise finish to your work as the motor is more nearly balanced in comparison to a single phase motor. Finally, not to downgrade Grizzly's motor, but I doubt they are of similar quality to an older 3-phase...

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My dad gave me an old but awesome table saw years ago and told me the motor turned the wrong way. Nomenclature tag states its a GE CAP motor (aren't they all?). I do have a tag showing the possible wiring connections. Shows it has NO overload protection. What I DON'T have are marked wires. I have 2 wires connected to L1. I have 1 wire connected to Neutral. I have 3 wires tied together. Any info I have found indicates this is wired for high voltage. I would like to run it on low voltage. I also don't know the rotation. So far all the wiring info assumes you have marked wires. I cannot find any info as to which wire goes to which coil, etc. How can I identify each wire so I don't "let the smoke out". I learned years ago motors run on smoke. Once you let the smoke out, they don't work anymore. Lot's of sentimental as well as practical value at stake here, not to mention a GREAT learning opportunity (as well as teaching).


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Made to demanding specifications, these motors offer the same quality as the motors we install on our heavy-duty machines. All our motors are standard NEMA 56 frames and fit over 90% of the woodworking machinery on the market. These Open Drip Proof Motors (Open) are excellent replacement motors for use in relatively clean environments. Ideal for drill presses, fans, and bench machinery. Motors are dual voltage (110/220V) capacitor start. They feature standard NEMA 56 frames, all ball bearing construction, reversible rotation, 5/8" shafts, and are rated for continuous duty. Not for air compressor use.

Specifications:

Type: Open Size: 1 HP RPM: 1725 AMPS @ 110V/220V: 11.6A/5.8A Reversible rotation

Full 1 Year...

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Since my AC motors article, I have often been asked about how to reverse an AC induction motor. I didn't cover how induction motors start in any detail earlier because that's an extensive topic on it's own.

The rotor of an induction motor is essentially a permeable iron core with an aluminium short circuit winding cast in place. You can see the aluminium on both ends of the rotor. The aluminium also goes through lengthwise holes in the rotor to make a "squirrel cage" type short circuit winding. You can barely see lines, at a slight angle on the rotor where the windings pass through.

The short circuit winding causes the rotor to resist rapid changes in magnetic fields, so if it's subjected to a spinning magnetic field, it will try to follow it. (more on that here)

In a three phase motor, three phases on three windings naturally create a spinning magnetic field. But for single phase AC motors, the magnetic field only alternates back and forth. Some trickery...

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You DO have a wiring diagram. It's there on the data plate and it shows how to hook up the leads for 110 volt or 220 volt service.

To have forward-reverse operation, you need to separate out leads T5 and T8 since they are your starting winding leads. Forward & reverse is achieved by reversing how those leads are connected to the main winding and the 110 volt supply. As it says, "interchange T5 and T8 for CW" which means that if you hook it up as shown on the diagram, it will turn counter clockwise. If you reverse the leads T5 and T8 it will turn clockwise.

The job of the drum switch is to apply 110 volts to the main winding and 110 volts to the start winding AND to give you the option of changing how T5 and T8 are connected---either in phase with the main winding or out of phase with the main winding. The exact terminal hook-up inside the switch will depend on how the switch is configured inside. There should be some information about that on the inside of the cover of the...

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Hi, I'm Norm and I'd like to help. I've attached a page from the Square D motor control wiring diagram book that has the diagram for a 6-pole reversing drum switch, which is a universal application, so the diagrams also apply to your Dayton switch. The diagram for your application is Figure 3. This diagram applies to both 240-Volt and 120-Volt connections. When connecting a 120-Volt motor, the botXXXXX XXXXXne is the neutral.

Hi. I'm back. Attached is another sketch with the motor terminals identified. I could not find a diagram with motor terminal designations that corresponded to your 240-Volt motor connections. The connections shown here are for a dual-voltage 120/240-Volt motor and are industry standard. It will, in fact, require a four-wire cable between the switch and the motor. To get specific with your motor, I need more information, specifically the Grainger catalog number, which should be something like 2E456 or similar numbering. We can go from there if you...

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Can't anyone look at the attached PDF for the motor wiring???? Instead of speculations and theories, it is much better to provide an actual solution for the OP's question.... which is pretty simple if anyone bothered to look at the motor specs....

In the above circuit, the motor will be rotating counter clockwise when Relay is not energized, once the relay is energized, then the motor will spin clockwise.... Just remember to have to motor power off, and the motor needs to be at a complete stop before switching rotation direction, if you try to switch the rotation while the motor is spinning or powered up, it will just continue to go in the same direction and WILL NOT switch directions.

The same wiring can apply to a DPDT switch since the illustration shows a DPDT relay, just connect the same connections to your switches NO, and NC connections....

B....

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Reversing and Repair of Electric Motors

The Selection, Connection, Reversing and Repair of Electric Motors

by Robert W. Lamparter
ASCII-only reprint with permission from "Home Shop Machinist"
July/August 1987 Vol. 6 no. 4
Submitted and Data Entered by Grant Erwin

Selecting a motor and connecting the electricals are the first challenges encountered after purchasing that long coveted machine tool. There are several types of single phase AC motors in current production in the U.S., but only two types are commonly used in powering our equipment.

TYPES OF MOTORS

For the purpose of clarity I will describe the features of the common types of fractional horsepower motors.

Universal or series motors are those having brushes and a wound rotor. An example of this type is that found in a portable drill or a Dremel tool. They are also distinguished by their noisiness.

Induction or shaded pole motors are the ones...

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