Questions about: moisture

Come on, you can't say "nitty-gritty" without thinking about and saying it like Ignacio (aka: Nachooooo!) Last week was sort of a bust. .
I will probably install a glue down engineered wood floor directly on the concrete slab, but which sealer should I use as a vapor barrier? You mentioned a 2 part epoxy sealant, but would that be enough vapor barrier to simply glue down the wood floor
What the contractor is "full of" is excellent advice. If you really want to spend money like you have a firehose connected to your wallet, dig out around the outside of the house to the footings and put drains there which slope out to daylight (or a
telefunken, This is a general article I wrote, discard what you feel is not relevant to your project. I guess this is the best and most economical way to construct walls that would be placed on the exterior. I prefer to see 2x4 but as mentioned by ot
You don't mention where you live so it is hard to give specific advice. The best suggestion is that if it will be climate controlled, it should be built similar to any other climate controlled structure in your area. That means keeping damp, warm air
Horizontal cracking? That's odd, and I think that's unrelated to your moisture problem (even with a picture, I'm not sure I'd comment on that). Well, you've air sealed your house, which means that now you have to actually pay attention to the V in HV
I removed the cement board to replace it, and discovered that the moisture had apparently penetrated the cement board and reached one group of studs: I don't see anything that looks obviously like mold, and there's no moisture palpable in the affecte
Assuming that this is a new 4 inches of floor on a ground level structure. .
I think the key thing is to use a quality house wrap made for the concrete/fiber lap siding. Concrete fiber siding will transfer moisture much more readily then wood, vinyl, etc. Products like DuPont DrainWrap (essentially their standard house wrap t
Be careful when tightening the bolt more, it might pull out of the wood completely if it is screwed into the wood somewhere. If it is a bolt that goes all the way through the wood with a washer on each side, though, you can probably try tightening it