Put mortar on cement board for outdoor kitchen

1

Hi Elle and welcome to the How-to- Community.

Elle quick answer to your first question is;

Even though cement board is getting covered with the brick you should still tape and mud all of the joints.

Taping and mudding joints makes one monolithic unit out of the individual boards. If you were not to tape your joints you would #1 not get your warranty from the manufacturer of the CEMENT BOARD, #2 fall in to the risk of expansion (crack) of the cement board telescoping on to the surface of the veneer. On a side note another way to avoid expansion cracks is to hang the board horizontally staggered.

Question #2;

YES, cement board is, no doubt, the best possible backer board for the stone veneer. Once it gets fastened, taped and mudded your cement board wall is going to be as solid as one of the exterior walls in your house. Again remember to stager the boards during the installation, once hung boards should resemble the brick pattern.

I skipped...

0 0
2

Video Transcript

RON HAZELTON:
You know, after finishing a job like patching that hole in the wall, I like to relax a little bit and nothing is more relaxing for me than grilling outside. Well, Tom Bourbon and Rebecca Sweet, they live out in Los Altos, California love to cook outside too.

They asked me to come out and give them a hand with a very interesting project.
[SOUND CUT]
RON HAZELTON:
So this is where you were thinking, right here, huh?
TOM:
Right in this corner.
RON HAZELTON:
Now, you cook outside. Who's the outdoor cook?
TOM:
I do the outdoor cooking.
REBECCA:
Tom yeah, indoor.
RON HAZELTON:
And Rebecca, you're the indoor.
[BOTH SPEAK AT ONCE]
REBECCA:
Indoor, indoor cooking.
RON HAZELTON:
You have a nice division of labor there.
TOM:
Right.
RON HAZELTON:
So, how are you doing it now?
TOM:
Well I have a barbecue that I have to...

0 0
3

Hello all! If you are just joining me, I am in the middle of redoing my husbands home office. His office is technically the pool house and the whole outside area – including the pool – is getting a much needed facelift. I decided I wanted to try tiling myself, because it is so very expensive to have it done for you. I paid $1.78 for this tile and the cost to have it put down was about an additional $4 per square foot! I’m not even sure that included the cement backerboard installation. So, I decided this would be a great place to see if tile is a DIY or not.

The pool house was almost unfinished when we move here. It was full of old doors, couches and bugs. You know, general disgustingness.

You can read more about that HERE. Once we got it all cleaned out and a few fresh coats of paint, it was time to work on the floor. What we started with was this very rough, particle board subfloor stuff. I’ve split the tile laying into two posts, this one is just...

0 0
4

This DIY, wood-fired, outdoor masonry stove can be used four ways: for baking, grilling, cooking, and smoking. Whatever your cooking needs, our outdoor stove/oven/grill/smoker can do it, thanks to interchangeable grill grates and griddle surfaces. If you want to grill steaks or fish, use the grill grate. If you want to bake bread, slide on the steel griddle, stack some bricks on top to retain heat and add the door to hold in the heat. If you want to use the stove top, just slide the metal plate (or griddle) over the top of the firebox.

The MOTHER EARTH NEWS editors and I wanted to design a highly efficient, multi-purpose stove that uses little firewood (or charcoal) and retains heat for baking and cooking. So, we included a thick insulation layer of lightweight perlite/cement between the firebox and surrounding concrete block, and we included a removable door. This design holds the heat in the firebox where it’s needed. (Perlite is the porous white stuff often found in...

0 0
5

1

For a concrete path use 1:5, where 1 stands for ordinary dry cement, and 5 is for the sand and ballast. For concrete steps, make the mix maybe a bit stronger, 1:4. If you’re laying bricks, it’s 1:4 (soft sand). For rendering, use 1:4 (2 fine-washed and 2 soft sand). If you’re doing a floor screed, it should be 1:3 (sharp sand).

2

Additives are available for many tasks if required. Plasticiser is excellent in mortar, but be careful not to use too much. A frost proofer can help if the temperature drops to around the zero mark, although I prefer not to work with cement if it’s that cold, just to be on the safe side. If it is cold or damp, you could use an accelerator to speed up the drying time to about an hour, although I must admit that I like it to dry naturally. For rendering, you’ll need a waterproofer in the first coat, so that it doesn’t bridge any damp proof course. You’ll also need it if tanking a basement.

3

For tools, you should...

0 0
6

With the old countertop stripped completely off, and the wall behind in good condition, measure your cabinets from the back wall to the front edge of your face frame. If you have frameless cabinets, measure to the front just behind the doors or drawer fronts. Subtract 1/8 in. from the measurement to allow for slight deviations in the wall and then measure the length. Transfer the measurements to the plywood and cut it with a circular saw and a straightedge guide for a clean, even cut.

Before you screw the plywood to the top of the cabinets, attach 2x2 wall cleats to the studs where there isn't any cabinet support (Photo 1). If you have a dishwasher opening, cut thinner 1x3 pine to length and screw it to the studs to make sure you've got plenty of room for the backside of the dishwasher.

Choose screws that will penetrate the drywall and go into the studs about 1 in. Longer screws could hit water pipes or electrical wires behind the wall. Screw the plywood (drill a...

0 0
7

1. Cultured stone to veneer the kitchen box. Available at home centers and stone yards. You will need a few boxes of corner pieces, as well as flat face pieces, sold by the square foot. Get about 10 percent more than you need to account for trims, cuts, and broken pieces.

2. Pressure-treated 2x4s to build the frame for the box. You will need 15 to 20 10-foot pieces.

3. 3/4-inch pressure-treated plywood to sheathe the frame. Get four 8-by-4-foot sheets.

4....

0 0
8


Straight cuts in cement backer board can be made using a circular saw.

I just remodeled one of our bathrooms, which included tiling the floor with 12”x 12” Turkish tumbled marble. It was a fun project to work on (it’s a small room) and the tiles look terrific, but the most important step of the entire job was prepping the subfloor.

After ripping up the old vinyl flooring, I discovered that the subfloor consisted of two layers of...

0 0
9

1. Do I put down felt paper first (If so, I understand how to overlap it starting at the bottom and working my way to the top). What do I use to attach it to the Hardibacker? I would like to use staples but I don't think any staple gun will push into Hardibacker?

2. In a previous post, I saw that someone said that a guy used the wrong type of metal lath (one for stucco)? At my homedepot, I saw just one type in the drywall section. It had what appeared to be a whole bunch of small diamond shapes. Is this the type I need or do I need something else? Does it need to be galvanized?

3. Is there a special way to attach the metal lath? I would assume I need screws to get it to stick to the Hardibacker (if so, I have read/seen videos on how to start from the middle of the lath and work my way out)? What type of screws should I use?

4. Scratch coat will be whatever type of mortar the stone calls for, I would assume?

5. Lastly, unrelated to the stone, what do...

0 0
10

Our builder installed our tile floor on...

0 0
11

I'd definitely do the lath. You don't gain anything from skipping it. Your stone work will fall off.

And Jim (Tubby) will reply shortly with similar advice - I can guarantee it.

Aww you know me well Jesse...........

A few reasons why I always recommend installing the stone per manufacturers specs and to building codes is I am a distributor and installing contractor for Eldorado Stone and my installs are done for prominent home builders and developers so of course I will recommend the method deemed the "correct" way by the building industry, now don't get me wrong as a owner builder you can glue the veneer to your hardie with "Elmers School Glue" if you so desire but.........

Cement products want to adhere to cement or cement based sub straights Hardie is not a cement based product (heck the hardie backer boards are not even rated for exterior use for that matter) none the less you use lathe and a scratch coat because the scratch will stick to itself...

0 0
12

Contrary to popular opinion, "greenboard is not regular GWB with a water-resistant paper finish; in addition to the special paper front and back, it has a water-resistant gypsum core.

Last year USG finally gave in to industry, code and mold lawsuit pressures and changed their recommendation for greenboard to:
"Perfect for use in areas such as bathrooms, powder rooms, kitchens, and utility rooms with incidental moisture exposure. Not designed for use in high-moisture areas such as tub and shower surrounds."
and

"Do not use in tub and shower surrounds; use...

0 0