R80 reflectors, light coming though upstairs

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1. Briefly outline the process of lighting a show.

My approach to lighting is primarily based on Stanley McCandless' method. McCandless was a professor at Yale University (1925-1964) and was one of the first teachers to offer a course in Stage Lighting. His two major works, A Method of Lighting the Stage and A Syllabus of Stage Lighting were originally published in the 1930s.

I divide the process into three phases: Research, Design and Execution.

Research Phase Read the script. What is the setting of the play? When does it take place? What is the time frame of each scene? What (and where) is the "light source?" Are specific Qs mentioned in the text? What is the style of the work? The mood? Examine the scene and costume designs. What is the location of the doors, windows, and drops? Have lighting positions been blocked by scenic pieces? What is the color of the set? What is the color of the costumes? Visit the theatre. Is there a cove position? Box...
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Almost every object will reflect light in some way. In fact, if an object does not produce its own light it will not be visible if it does not reflect that of other sources.

Reflection works by angles. Light shines onto a surface in what is called an incident ray. The angle that this ray strikes the surface of the object is measured by imagining a line coming out from the surface at the point that the light strikes it, at right angles to the object. The reflected ray moves off the object at exactly the same angle, but on the other side of the line.

There are two main types of reflection. The first is specular reflection. This is when light gets reflected from a smooth surface and produces the clearest results. The other type of reflection is diffuse reflection. This is when the surface of the object is not smooth. In this situation, the light is reflected at different angles that correspond with the different angles of the surface. An example is light the is reflected...

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UNIT THREE

TEXT THREE

ONE STAIR UP

By Campbell Naime

(Fragment)

Nairne, Campbell, a Scottish novelist, the author of two books "One Stair Up" (1932) and "Stony Ground" (1934). "One Stair Up" deals with the life of an Edinburgh working-class family and is characterized by realism, a fine style and a sense of humour.

They went up a short marble staircase, treading without sound on a rich carpet of some green material that yielded like springing turf, and moved across a salon hung everywhere with the coloured and signed portraits of film stars. Back in this dim region of luxury, quite still except for the soft whirring of fans they could hear a tea-spoon chink, a cup grate on a saucer, a voice rise above another voice and sink again into voluptuous stillness. Out of a door marked "Circle" over the bull's-eye in each of its two folding partitions, a trim girl in a chocolate uniform with blue pipings silently emerged, glanced at the...

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Learn how to Communicate with "Your" Angels - Ask your personal and heartfelt questions to your Angels by asking for a personal connection to your Angels. Your readings may include information about your personal guardian angels and spirit guides, past lifetimes, spiritual soul mates and twin flames, the energies that you are with you currently and will be working with, children and family, finances and career, hopes and dreams , fears, realities and more.

Ask Up Stairs and you will connect with the other side such as your own angels, spirit guides, your passed loved ones, Archangels and Ascended Masters. You may receive information about your personal guardian angels and spirit guides, past lifetimes, spiritual soul mates and twin flames, the energies that you are with currently and will be working with, children and family, finances and career, hopes and dreams , fears, realities and more. Our Angels know our life purpose and where we may be blocked due to stress...

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During the rehearsal as I was looking through my viewfinder, I noticed a wonderful reflection that bounced off of the silver briefcase, filling in Robin's face for a moment as he placed it on the bed. I asked if he would be okay deliberately positioning it in a way that it would happen and he agreed - nailed it every time :)

THE CAMERA

So what about my camera settings? Why 1600 ISO!?? Well, like I said I was about a stop under with my promist filter in front of the lens and I was really happy with my lighting - I didn't want to go messing with it now, besides, we were running out of time (as usual) so I upped the ISO instead. I normally rate RED at 800 ISO all day, every day (but sometimes 320 at night). I've been shooting with RED since 2011 and post processing it for just as long...this really gives me confidence when pushing exposure because I know what to expect. On top of that, I was shooting 6K Full Format - not to be confused with Full Frame - did you know...

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The Neewer Flat Panel Reflector is a great tool designed for those looking for the benefit of something such as a V-flat or large reflector frame without the bulk of having to haul them around. The Neewer Flat Panel Reflector is basically a 3 foot by 6 foot wind sail that you can use as reflector or flag during virtually any shoot. At $69.99 the Flat Panel Reflector offers fantastic value for an innovative new light modifier to add to your arsenal.

The official product name on Amazon for this handy little toy is the Neewer 35" x 70"/ 90 x 180cm Photo Studio Gold/Silver & Black/White Flat Panel Light Reflector with 360 degree Rotating Holding Bracket and Carrying Bag, which is quite the mouthful but Neewer certainly has covered their bases for as much searchability as possible. In fact, it's how I stumbled upon this product. Initially I didn't even know that it existed and came across it while searching for something else. At first glance, I was immediately intrigued so...

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Cycle Sense: Why Reflectors Don't Work

Cycle Sense:
Why Reflectors Don't Work

If you go for a drive tonight, you'll see reflectors shining brightly from mailboxes. You'll see reflectorized stop signs. If bike riders are out, you'll see their pedal reflectors . All these reflectors will appear bright, and very easy to avoid.

So here's the seven-million-dollar question: If all these reflectors are so darn bright and easy to see, how come the bike safety nerds insist you need active lights to be seen at night?

There is a very scientific answer: reflectors work only under very specific conditions. Those conditions happen to prevail in most of the nighttime driving we do, so we get the impression that reflectors work most or all of the time. But reflectors don't work at all if those conditions aren't met, and many well-defined bicycle crash types occur in situations when we can expect reflectors to not work.

Few people understand...

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