Removing switch from gang box. What is the appropriate way to cap the circuit?

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Someone enters the same room near the switch at the right of the graphic. He or she flips that switch. Now there is again a pathway for the electricity. This time it flows over the second of the two wires running between the switches.

When you encounter what was supposed to be a three-way circuit, and you can turn it "on" at one of the switches, but not at the other switch, unless the first switch is already "on," the problem is usually that one of the wires going into the switch is on a terminal for one of the two wires going out of the switch.

Not all three-way switches are the same, either. All of them have two screws on one side of the switch and one screw on the other side. But, the screws for the wires running between the switches may be on the same side of the switch, or they may be on opposite sides of the switch at the same end of the switch. You cannot make assumptions. It is not uncommon to find that one switch in a three-way circuit uses one arrangement,...

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Begin wiring an outlet for an electric stove by nailing the gang box on a stud near the future location of the outlet. When nailing the gang box, ensure that its lip extends beyond the stud by a distance equal to the wall board's thickness.

Now, remove the tab located at gang box's bottom or top, whichever is closer to the circuit breaker, with a screwdriver to create an opening. Switch off the circuit breaker at the box and feed one end of its cable in the gang box via the opening created. Allow around 4 inches of the cable to come out of the box.

Using wire cutters, pull out approximately 2 inches of the insulation off the cable to expose the white, red and black wires within. Then, pull out about 1/2 inch of insulation from the three wires.

Next, unscrew the screws on the terminals located at the back of the outlet. Insert the exposed wiring of the white wire into the negative terminal and that of the black and red wires into the two positive terminals....

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Churning with voltage and resembling an explosion at the wire factory, the breaker panel exudes mystique. But it's just a big switch, filled with other smaller switches, which lead to the switches that any home owner can fearlessly flip. Doing so conjures a current of electrons that runs along copper wires, energizing our appliances, lights and modern lives. Breaker-panel literacy isn't only for voltage veterans who recite the National Electrical Code. Even if all you wonder is whether your humble hot tub dreams are electrically attainable, or why the toaster oven kills the kitchen lights—the panel has a thing or two to tell you.

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J. Muckle

NEUTRAL AND HOT WIRES

Current flows from the panel toward the load along the hot wires and returns along the neutral. Each hot wire's copper tip ultimately connects to its control switch at the circuit breaker, and each neutral connects to a common terminal called a bus...

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I know I don't have as much understanding of circuits as I'd like, but I'm familiar with enough to have gotten me this far. But I've never purchased a switch like the WT00Z1 before, and I'm confused as to its wiring diagram.

I understand that it's not using a travel wire. I understand it needs the neutral wire. What I don't understand is why it needs the load wire and not the line. I would have thought it needed the neutral and ground but nothing else. I gather that these things are merely very minimal scene controllers. With my other scene controllers all I've needed was neutral and ground.

Besides, if I'm removing the switch I used to have on my 3-way circuit with the WT00Z1, don't I need to complete the circuit, bypassing the WT00Z1 altogether? If I have a Linear WD500Z-1 on one end and the WT00Z1 on the other, don't I just cap the traveler wire on both ends, and tie the line/load lines together on the WT00Z1 end?

Please correct me wherever I'm wrong, and I...

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Electrical boxes for outlets, light switches, and other devices are expected to contain both the back of the device and the wires leading up to it. One frustrating aspect of electrical work is pushing wires into the box after you have connected the device. Boxes always seem to be too small, devices too big, and wires too numerous. Is there a way to accurately gauge the types and quantities of wires that go into a box?

Yes, this can be done quite easily with plastic boxes and almost as easily with metal boxes. Once this is determined, there are a few tricks to safely pushing the wires into the boxes.

Stay Within Electrical Box-Fill Capacity Limits

As determined by the electrical code, electrical boxes have limits as to the type and quantity of wires they can accommodate. The plastic coating of wires that are too tightly packed can fray along stress points, potentially shorting out, arcing, or creating any number of safety hazards.

Plastic Electrical...

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With the switches and fixtures correctly wired, it's time to wire the main circuit panel. After stripping the incoming cable, connect the neutral and ground wires to their corresponding bus bars. To finish the circuit, connect the hot wire to a circuit breaker, which itself is connected to the panel's hot bus.

Using a volt-ohm meter set to ohms, touch the probes to the various busses on the panel, and then change the position of the three-way switches for another reading. A slight energy reading indicates the circuit is sound.

Screw in the light bulb and plug in the exhaust fan. Flip the main breaker to energize the panel. Before flipping the branch circuit breaker, verify the current using the meter, this time set to volts. With the reading well within perimeters, it's safe to flip on the branch...

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You will also need the following resistors:

(1) 10K, (2) 12K, (1) 100K, (1) 375K and (1) 510K

Try to use 1% resistors for this calibration. Confirm the resistor values by measurement with a known accurate digital ohm meter. The two 12K resistors are connected in parallel (for 6K) for the SHUNT test-calibration.

A good vacuum tube - 6L6 is recommended - actual transconductance is not important but it should test good.

For the TV-7/U you might need an adjustable resistance decade box for selecting resistor values in some of the calibration steps. It won't be necessary for the "lettered versions," TV-7A, B or D.

Use TM11-6625-274-35 (the military TV-7 Field and Depot Maintenance Manual) for the calibration procedure. This is available as a free download PDF on the "BAMA edebris" website.

Tests Required - The tests performed will involve Bias Voltage Test, Plate Voltage and Line Level Test, Screen Voltage Test, Short Circuit Test,...

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1936

NC-100 and NC-100X introduced in August 1936

Aluminum sheet metal overlay for front panel is silk screened in black and red along with silver - used on both NC-100 and NC -100X

PW-D micrometer dial is bluish-gray on the Index Dial and red with white numbers on the Number Dial on NC-100. PW-D is light gray Index dial and black with white numbers on
Number Dial on NC-100X

Chassis is painted gray on both NC-100 and NC-100X

Power transformer top cover has four large ventilation holes

6E5 cathode ray tuning eye tube is used

Rack mount versions will not have aluminum overlay, panel is 3/16" aluminum with engraved markings, black wrinkle finish, eye tube used. Some versions may have single-ended audio output. Some rack mounted versions will use National supplied rack mounting brackets that mount to a standard table cabinet thus allowing rack mounting.

The first NC-100 and NC-100X receivers were built in production run ...

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Tuner Reviews S-Z

Tuners are listed alphabetically by manufacturer and in alphabetical and numerical sequence by model number. In parentheses after the model number are the year of introduction and most recent list price, and/or the original list price if indicated by "orig" (special thanks to David Rich of The Audio Critic for copies of historical material from his reference library). Please see the On-Deck Circle for tuners that we know very little about or that we're not sure merit a writeup. We have posted updated eBay sale price data in this section through August, 2011; data for "as is" or damaged tuners, or otherwise unrepresentative auctions, may be excluded.

SAE: There are a couple of SAE tuners in our On-Deck Circle that we'd like to consider...

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Copyright ©2001-2018 Tuner Information Center. Permission is hereby granted to quote our text so long as proper credit is given. eBay listings that quote us incorrectly or without credit may be terminated without notice.

Yamaha Tuners

Tuners are listed in alphabetical and numerical sequence by model number. In parentheses after the model number are the year of introduction and most recent list price, and/or the original list price if indicated by "orig." Special thanks to David Rich of The Audio Critic for copies of historical material from his reference library. We have posted updated eBay sale price data on this page through August, 2011; data for "as is" or damaged tuners, or otherwise unrepresentative auctions, may be excluded.

There are many Yamaha tuners in our On-Deck Circle that we'd like to consider listing here if our readers will provide some basic information on them (types of controls and features, and any personal anecdotes or comparisons to other...

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Juliegrace Brufke - 03/26/18 07:05 PM EDT

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Avery Anapol - 03/26/18 04:29 PM EDT

Brett Samuels - 03/26/18 04:27 PM EDT

Morgan Gstalter - 03/26/18 04:09 PM EDT

Joe Concha - 03/26/18 04:02 PM EDT

Luis Sanchez - 03/26/18 03:59 PM EDT

Avery Anapol - 03/26/18 03:42 PM EDT

Reid Wilson - 03/26/18 02:34 PM EDT

Avery Anapol - 03/26/18 02:33 PM EDT

Jordan Fabian - 03/26/18 02:29 PM EDT

Rebecca Savransky - 03/26/18 02:11 PM EDT

Jordain Carney - 03/26/18 02:00 PM EDT

Luis Sanchez - 03/26/18 01:47 PM EDT

Mallory Shelbourne - 03/26/18 12:59 PM EDT

Ben Kamisar - 03/26/18 12:48 PM EDT

Cate Martel - 03/26/18 12:46 PM EDT

Jordain Carney - 03/26/18 12:33 PM...

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