Two outdoor Refrigerators running through a 15 amp breaker

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dont let anyone convince you to dump the kegerator - it's the most important thing in the whole island!

if you are putting the kegs under the deck, then you have plenty of room since all you need is room for the tap, the drip tray (which you should probably plumb into the drain if you have drainage nearby), you can get pre-made tubing that has a beerline, air & return line, and insulation all built in. you just stick a low voltage blower in the kegerator and leave it on all the time. or you can go crazy and put in a full glycol system. given that you homebrew you prob have multiple beers going at once so maybe put in a double tap so you can offer a choice of beer?

i wouldn't worry about the trash - it's just something that you need to remember to empty so it doesn't smell.

as for layout, you have the food/drink stuff split up. what if you put the keg, fridge and refresh center on the long side. the grill on the bottom, the burner in the corrner, and the egg...

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In this how to install a sub panel installation I will guide you through the complete installation of a subpanel step by step.

The first question is why are you installing a sub panel. There are either one or two reasons to do this. One because you need more room in your existing panel and in that case if your existing panel is old this would be a great time to just upgrade your current service. Newer 200 amp main panels hold a lot more circuits / breakers.

Two, because you need to bring more power somewhere else like a garage you just built or an addition or even in some cases a finished basement. Either way, you want to install a sub panel. Ok. So let’s get going.

First: Where do you plan on placing the new sub panel? If it’s right next to you main panel that’s one thing, but further away like in that new garage you just built 100 feet away you will certainly want to figure in voltage drop. I can’t get too much into that because ever setup would be...

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Posted: 10/8/2011 9:55:23 AM EDT

[Last Edit: 10/8/2011 9:59:26 AM EDT by hightech_redneck]

Originally Posted By itstock:
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Originally Posted By WildApple:
I have a refridgerator in the garage. Does it need a GFI outlet? Should I run a uninterruptible power supply on the fridge too as a safety measure?

By NEC code the receptacle needs to have GFCI protection.

FWIW, a new refrigerator should not have any issues.

That's current code. The house may have been constructed before the requirement and grandfathered.

How old the house is does not exempt him from doing things by current code

I understand that. We don't know all the facts of...

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Most RV owners have little understanding about how the refrigerator works beyond turning it on and switching between gas and electric operation. When the beer feels warm and the butter is melted, then it’s time fill the cooler with ice and make a last ditch effort to save the food.

The one thing you need to know is that your RV refrigerator operates completely different from your home refrigerator:

There is no compressor pumping Freon through coils. Instead, heat from either an electric element or a small flame causes a percolating action that circulates an ammonia mixture through cooling tubes. In many ways, this is a simpler — easier to troubleshoot — method of cooling with its own built-in back-up system. Most RV refrigerators operate on either 110 VAC or propane gas. Some also operate on 12 VDC as well.

If your RV refrigerator fails, the following steps will help you localize the problem, and (hopefully) get you back up and running at little or no...

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