Vapor Barrier for Wine Cellar

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wine cellars are special creatures because they have their own temperature and humdity control systems. its further complicated by the fact that where you are and your local climate change how you build them (in modern homes anyway)

in most homes or buildings, the desire is to keep the cold dry air out and the warm humid air in. thus the need for the vapour barrier inside the wall (on the warm, humid side of the wall).

however, in a wine cellar, it can sometimes be cold and dry on the inside of the room (compared to the outside conditions). in a place thats very humid, you can get the exact opposite effect where condensation builds up on the room side of the vapour barrier, which does create problems.

the traditional way to solve this was not to. the stone walls of the wine cellar didnt care if they got wet. they were stone. however, nowadays, we have less stone and more man made materials.

the simplest fix is just encapsulate the foam inside and out...

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Once you’ve built your walls you’ll need to add a vapor barrier. The vapor barrier serves to prevent the cooled air from the cellar from leaking into the walls. It’s not really designed to prevent heat loss, which will be modest, but rather helps to prevent cool air from meeting warmer, moister air in the walls, which causes condensation. That condensation can lead to rot in your studs, but more damagingly, it can get stuck in your insulation, reducing its effective r-value, and setting you up for insidious mold issues! Don’t skimp here!

In order to be effective you’ll have to put a complete vapor barrier up in your cellar, which is easy to do since a vapor barrier is essentially a thin plastic sheet nailed to the studs over the insulation. In the case of your foam board insulated foundation walls you won’t have to worry about reduced r-values, since the foam boards are impervious to wicking, but the mold issue is still worth taking care of. So, wrap that...

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There is some information missing here. Is this an above ground, below ground, within the house, or a free standing exterior wine cellar? Regardless of which though, I personally think fiberglass batts are not such a good idea because of mold growth potential. I'd spray foam between the studs to fill voids and seal off the vapor issue, and then mount the finish interior wood or whatever you are putting in there. Sheetrock is also a poor choice, but you have too, use the green stuff used in bathrooms or the new no mold stuff, and paint Spray foam has superior R-value to foam batts and serves as a vapor barrier itself. Besides the looks, there's a good reason why redwood makes for a good interior wall surface--it doesn't decompose even if mold occurs. The bubble wrap radiant foil might work well too, if you cover the walls with racks to reduce the glare.

BTW, have you figured out what kind of cooling system to use? If insulated properly, you don't really need the expensive...

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60 to 70 percent humidity level is ideal for a wine cellar. 80 to 100 percent humidity for extended periods of time may cause mold, thus rotting your labels and possibly tainting the cork, as well as cause mold/mildew problems on walls and floor and associated problems. As you know, humidity level must be kept constant to keep corks from popping.

Only certain wood species are chosen to fashion the shelves and molding. Honduran mahogany, all-heart redwood, red oak and Georgian pecan are examples of woods which serve cellar designs well. I have read where folks use rot resistant cedar, but others report that because the wood is so aromatic that it should not be used.

Some folks install an air conditioning system that enables a constant temperature of between 8-15C to be maintained. A carbon filter can be used if the wine cellar is placed in an area with stale air. Humidistats that control humidity via evaporation of water from the condenser unit in a controlled...

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I am interested in constructing a do-it-yourself wine cellar in my basement but am having a problem locating any resources for information on proper construction techniques, sizing, etc. Would you know of any resources of information on the net or otherwise that I could consult? My searches have netted very little information thus far and I am getting tired of moving cases around so I would like to get started.

I posed this issue to participants in the Wine Lovers’ Discussion Group, who responded in that and ensuing discussions with the following comments. As time goes by, we’ll add new hints and tips; and anyone reading this page is also encouraged to help us continue to improve this cellar-building FAQ with your E-Mail submissions.

Step 1….

Posted by Eric Stauffer

Convince your wife that this is actually necessary. Jewels, (diamond earrings worked for me) are highly effective. This is the most important step. Additional steps are promising to...

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Wine Cellar Creations can help you create a custom wine cellar to satisfy all your wine needs. From Pine and Mahogany wine racking systems to free standing cellar's and cooling units. Together we can build what your looking for. Please contact us for details.

How To Build A Wine Cellar

Choose a site
When constructing a wine cellar, you are basically building a refrigerator. The first thing to do is to decide where and what size you want your cellar.

Vapor barrier
A vapor barrier should be installed on the warm side of all walls and ceiling (the wine cellar is the cold side). Concrete floors should be sealed with a water base sealant.

Walls
The next step is to frame out your walls-2"x4" interior walls and 2"x6" exterior walls. If you are going to use rigid Cleotex/R-max type with foil on both sides you can frame interior walls with 2"x2" with 1.5"rigid and your exterior walls 2"x4" with 3" rigid.

Insulation
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Wine Cellar Construction

Topic: The placement of insulation and a vapor barrier in a wine cellar.

Insulating a wine cellar provides a heat/cold break between the inside of the cellar and the adjacent spaces around the cellar. The fact that the ground temperature varies between 520 during Chicago winters and 640 in the summer confirms the reasoning behind insulation, even for exterior walls. A ten-inch thick concrete wall has an insulation factor of r1. Basically it is an open window to whatever environment lay on the other side. Insulation is cheap compared to buying a cooling unit that is twice the size required for the same room if properly insulated.

A vapor barrier, encapsulating the entire cellar, is required. Its presence between the foundation wall and the insulation prevents the migration of moisture from the outside to the insulation. Wet insulation will evolve over time into wet drywall, which in turn will evolve into mold. Typically vapor barriers...

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Building Your Own Wine Room or Wine Cellar

Building Your Own Wine Room or Wine Cellar

NOTICE: This was the most popular feature of the Bracksco Wine Nook website, so we are leaving it up, even though we retired and have taken down the rest of the site.

Here we present some general advice and considerations for constructing your own wine room, based on our personal experience and research. This is a living document which is updated from time to time. The latest update was June 2016.

This is a wonderful tutorial...thank you very much...It was well written and very detailed...My contractor starts tomorrow and now I know what we should focus on. VM, Shelton, CT (January 2010)

Here are the steps involved in building a wine room (a generic term we'll be using instead of wine cellar, which implies it is in the basement, which it may or may not be).

Plan, PLAN, PLAN! Deconstruct (if starting with an existing room) Build or expand depth of walls,...
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Before I started sketching out what my wine closet was going to look like, I did some "back of the envelope" budgeting. Most entry-level wine cooling systems, such as the ChillR, start at $500 and quickly go up from there. Replacing the closet doors with properly-insulated doors would come in around $600 (more if installed). Add another $500 for everything else, and I was easily looking at $1,600. That seemed a bit much to me. After all, we're talking about a closet, not the Taj Mahal of wine here.

Capacity Requirements

So, I started over again, but this time I thought about what are my actual requirements. Without getting into too much details, I buy in bulk in order to save money. That means I typically buy approximately 15 cases of wine roughly every eight to twelve months. That batch of wine will be consumed over the next one to two years. I do have a few "special" bottles, but I keep those in a mini wine refrigerator. So, that means I'd need to have storage for...

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The Climate Control System Stabilizes the Wine Cellar Environment

The most important technical decision you’ll make regarding your custom wine cellar is choosing which refrigeration unit to install. Climate control in a wine cellar is far more than cooling. It’s about maintaining stable humidity and temperature.

This may involve cooling the space and it may also involve heating. It requires installing units built specially for wine cellars that can create the perfect environment for your wine.

Do I need a Climate Control Refrigeration System for my Wine Cellar?

When making a decision to go with a climate control system or having a passive wine cellar, there are several things to consider.

Am I a collector…? Do I buy wines that I will want to save for long periods of time before drinking or do I go through my wines quickly and rotate my bottles? If I find a wine that I like… do I buy in bulk to make sure it will be available to me in the future? Am I...
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Do you care about wine? Do you own a business that sells wine? Do you have a growing wine collection in your home? If you do, then you need a custom wine cellar or wine cabinet to store and protect your investment.

You want that wine to taste perfect when you open it. You need to contact the Wine Cellar Specialists TODAY to start your wine room, closet, or cabinet project. Working with the specialists in Dallas, Chicago, and San Antonio can save money, time, and make the entire process a joy. And you’ll end up with a beautiful storage system that stores your wine safely.

Many construction companies do not know how to build a proper wine cellar. You need to insulate the space with a vapor barrier and seal the space completely. You need a wine cooling and heating unit built specifically for wine that will maintain constant temperature and humidity. Traditional refrigeration and heating systems will not do.At Wine Cellar Specialists we have hundreds of happy...

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