What can happen if someone doesn't get a building permit for a renovation?

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This varies greatly from jurisdiction to jurisdiction. It also depends on what kind of work and how much.

In many locations, minor electrical work, in-kind plumbing replacement, interior construction that does not change the overall footprint or the number or types of bedrooms, bathrooms, etc, (such as the building of a closet in an existing room) need no permit. However, some locales may require new installations to come up to a newer code level than those that they replace. You really need to check with your local building department to see what is allowed without permit and when permits are required.

Failure to get a permit for work that requires one could result in a stop work order if the building authority learns of the project. It also could result in the property not having a valid certificate of occupancy, which could make selling the property difficult. It also might compromise your relationship with your lender. Finally, it may put your insurance coverage...

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Yesterday morning I got an email from a young aspiring journalist who wanted to know if a master's degree was worth it. His plight was pretty familiar: Go deeper into debt in a gamble to give your career a push, or keep on the same path, working a job while trying to cobble together a real-world education equivalent to an advanced degree.

I gave him the usual spiel I trot out when I get emails like that: Go back to school, take a chance! Then, as soon as I'd finished patting myself on the back for taking time out of my day to dole out life advice to a stranger, I was hiding in the back of the office, whispering to a representative from FedLoan Servicing through my cell. My payments had just inexplicably increased from $70 to $1,100 a month, and I was only able to talk them down to $186—an amount I still can't really afford considering the insane cost of living in New York City, where you basically have to pay for every breath you take.

I usually try to forget that...

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Quote:

I agree with you about changing a toilet or a sink, but the county health department requires it. There's a small risk of somebody dying if you don't hook up a drain properly.

With electric, most romex wires from the past decade have a date stamp on them, so a fire inspector or a building inspector would likely be able to tell when it was added.

In the city, there's a general building inspector, an electrical inspector, hvac and then the county health department for plumbing.

If you own a 4 unit building and want to do work yourself, then get a contractor's license and insurance. It isn't expensive. Then you can do the work yourself and be legit. Lots of landlords do this. If you are worried about taxes going up post renovation, then at the permit counter, tell them that your total cost for renovations is $1,000 whether it is $1,000 or $300,000. The woman says every time "it won't affect your assessment" and most people nod their head and...

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We're going to be remodeling our bathrooms (all 3) soon and my wife and I are arguing about whether we need to get building permits. (For reference, we're in San Jose, CA.)

Most of the work will be replacing existing features: new cabinets, counter tops, lights, new tile on the floor and in the shower enclosure, new toilets. We'll be removing one bathtub and turning it into a shower-only. A little sheet rock work, texturing, and paint.

The shower enclosure will change the position of the drain (from one end to the center of the shower). The lighting may require a little electrical work. (Maybe moving the position of the junction box (is that the right term?) so that the new light can connect to it easily.)

We won't be moving any walls, messing with the foundation, expanding the footprint of the house, or changing the floor plan in any way.

Do we need to get building permits? If so, why would we need them?
What are the advantages of getting...

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Even bathroom remodels need building permits.

(Trina Knudsen, Renovation Design Group)

We introduced the topic of building permits last week. Because of the cost involved and apprehension of working with the government, some homeowners are tempted to not get the proper permits for a home remodel. That is not a good idea. But when does a project actually need a permit? What does it cost? What happens if a permit is not obtained?

When do you need a permit?

When does a remodeling project need a permit? According to Salt Lake City’s Building Services and Civil Enforcement’s website at slcgov.com/building/faqs, “basically, all work being done requires a permit. The only exception to this is painting, laying flooring or other cosmetic issues.” When in doubt, request a permit. Better safe than sorry.

What does a building permit cost?

The cost of the permit is determined by the plan examiners based on a percentage of the anticipated construction...

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Permits are more or less in the jurisdiction of the city or governmental oversight, and may or may not impact the value of a home.

Most home improvement work does not require a permit, and it can be argued that a permit was not required, depending on who did the work, what was done, and how much it cost. It’s hard for a home buyer or inspector to immediately know that a permit ever needed to be pulled, since they’re only seeing the house as it stands, now.

The city, however, does keep records, and if the floor plan or survey plan changes from what was on paper, it’s going to raise a red flag. Worst case scenario that I’ve seen is that someone built an addition without a permit, and the city came down hard, required the addition to be demolished and rebuilt WITH a permit, regardless of the quality of work. If the city does flag a non-permitted job, it can get expensive to remedy the situation.

Regardless of the above, if the house is not flagged by the city, it...

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Why do I need a building permit?

Your home renovation must meet basic requirements for health, safety and structural soundness as set out by the Building Code of Australia. Beyond this, the permit process makes sure that your plans are in line with other local government requirements, such as planning regulations, environmental or heritage requirements.

When do I need approval?

Generally, approval is required for renovations that involve changes to the structure or shape of your home. This includes new additions, reconfiguration of internal space by moving or removing walls, new window and door openings or installing structures such as carports and pergolas. Electrical and plumbing approvals may also have to be obtained.

The good news is that some repairs and renovations may not require approval. Most state governments have introduced rules that allow minor internal changes and some minor external changes without needing approval. Some examples include...

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[Summary]What happens when you don't get a permit? • r/HomeImprovement So I purchased my home about 2 years ago. I've done a lot of work to it. All the big stuff,(kitchen, bathrooms,deck, roof, and siding) were done... What happens if I don't get a building p

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What happens when you don't get a permit? • r/HomeImprovement


So I purchased my home about 2 years ago. I've done a lot of work to it. All the big stuff,(kitchen, bathrooms,deck, roof, and siding) were done...

What happens if I don't get a building permit before I remodel my house?


What happens if I don't get a permit / inspection for my new bathroom?


As part of a home remodeling project, I'm having a second bathroom installed. Officially, I'm supposed to get a permit and inspection for the work. What are the consequences if I skip this? This...

Building Permits are Very Important to...

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As part of a home remodeling project, I'm having a second bathroom installed. Officially, I'm supposed to get a permit and inspection for the work. What are the consequences if I skip this? This is in Seattle.

Background, if you want context: immediately after the plumber puts in the ground work, I'm having a waterproofing company install a below-floor drainage pipe that empties to the sewer. The waterproofing people advised me that this step does not in itself require a permit / inspection, but if it is inspected, it will not pass, because private homes aren't allowed to empty rainwater into the sewer system. The volume of water is so low, he says, that it's negligible, but the law is still on the books. So he said we should get the bathroom ground work inspected first, and

then

have his company come in. That was the plan, but now, because of scheduling delays, I will probably not have the chance to have an inspector in after the plumbers are done, but before the...

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We introduced the topic of building permits last week. Because of the cost involved and apprehension of working with the government, some homeowners are tempted to not get the proper permits for a home remodel. That is not a good idea. But when does a project actually need a permit? What does it cost? What happens if a permit is not obtained?

When do you need a permit?

When does a remodeling project need a permit? According to Salt Lake City’s Building Services and Civil Enforcement’s website at slcgov.com/building/faqs, “basically, all work being done requires a permit. The only exception to this is painting, laying flooring or other cosmetic issues.” When in doubt, request a permit. Better safe than sorry.

What does a building permit cost?

The cost of the permit is determined by the plan examiners based on a percentage of the anticipated construction cost. This is one of the many reasons why a homeowner will need accurate project plans to do a home...

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Everyone knows that if you put an extension on your house, you will require a building permit. But what about for the smaller renos like a new kitchen, a new bathroom, installing larger windows or a new basement? Do you need a building permit for that ?

Do I Really Need a Building Permit for Renovations?

When we were visiting friends one day, we went out for a walk around their neighbourhood after dinner. We couldn’t help but notice that one of their neighbours on their street had constructed a 6’ high fence all around their property – including their front yard. Our friends joked that they had built a fortress around their house. Fortress indeed. But unfortunately, the homeowners with the fortress had obviously not checked the building code for their municipality – a neighbour complained, and their fortress came tumbling down. A very costly mistake.* As the owner of your home, you are ultimately responsible for complying with all building requirements. Failure to...

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One of our readers sent this the other day.

“We owned 70 acres in Lake County CO, surrounded by national forest with the exception of one small strip privately owned. The only access was a seasonal forest service road. Once the snow fell, the only way to get up there was snowmobile, snowshoeing, ultimately a snowcat. It was a very isolated chunk of land. After living up there in a 100 sq. ft cabin with loft for about a year, we came into a small inheritance and decided to build on. The window of warm weather at 11,000 + feet is about 4 months so we made the decision to build without getting proper permits, etc. telling ourselves it would be easier to get forgiveness than permission.

The additional structure was still rather small, 16 x 30 feet with loft space.
Amazingly, with the help of a couple friends, we finished, at least got it dried in, that summer. We lived up there through the next winter, working on the interior.

Long story short, someone turned...

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November 13th 2009


For the average homeowner, taking on a major home renovation yourself can be rewarding but also overwhelming. Whether you are building a home or doing a renovation, in order to avoid any costly surprises it's important to understand what is required and what you as a homeowner are capable of accomplishing. They need to consider questions like: Do you need a permit? Who gets the permit and from where? Overall, as the homeowner, you are legally responsible for obtaining any building permits required. However, your renovator can look after this on your behalf. Your contract should specify which permits are required and who will get them. A phone call to your local permit office is a good start to determine if you need a permit. Also it's important to understand that some jobs are best left to the professionals especially if it involves gas and electrical jobs.

When do I need a permit?

Generally, a building permit is required for...

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I am always surprised about the things people build without a permit. Recently in court I had a defendant who had built an addition without any permits. He couldn’t even claim ignorance because he was in the building trade. He then complained when the inspector saw that his deck had been built without a permit. The defendant’s excuse for that one was that he bought the house that way. In another case, the homeowners only hired subcontractors who wouldn’t apply for permits. One of the potential subcontractors asked too many questions, didn’t get hired and turned the owners in to the municipality. In my book, The Building Process Simplified, I discussed the trouble people can get into when they cut corners and don’t do their due diligence before they buy property. I only wish more people would read that chapter in the book before they begin construction. Given the current economic circumstances I’m suspect that more and more people are failing to get permits in order to save money....

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Why do a renovation loan over just taking the money out using a home equity loan?

Sometimes a home equity loan does make more sense but there are two major reasons why a renovation loan may make more sense.

First, a traditional home equity loan will only allow you to use the current (before improvements) value of your home as a basis to calculate your loan amount. If the project is large enough, you may need to use the completed (after improvement) value in order to borrow enough money to cover the cost of the project.

Second , Home Equity Lines of Credit are prime based adjustable rates and are really not suitable for long term financing needs.

What types of Construction Loans and Renovation Loans are available?

Construction / Perm loans are available to finance custom home construction, acquisition and/or remodeling of...

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—-GUIDE TO RESIDENTIAL BUILDING PERMITS —-

Residential Building permits how much does it cost in 2017

The minimum current fee is $198.59.
Renovation work is $4.93/ m2 & New work is $17.16/ m2
Basement Finishing $5.73/ m2, Underpinning $11.43 / lineal meter. For full fee schedule refer to ——->

1- Toronto Building permit fees schedule

Street Damage Deposit It’s required when you do an addition or New Construction, there is always
the possibility that the city street is damaged by heavy machinery if your Contractor is not careful on site.
Can you refuse to pay this deposit? Absolutely.
If your Contractor is extra careful during construction & you take good pictures of the existing state of the road in case of a dispute you can use this $2,271.65 towards the Construction.
Here is an interesting article by the Toronto Star dated Mar. 18, 2009 as to what happens to a good portion of the Street damage deposits.
1- Toronto Star...
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When you consider making improvements or additions to your home, it can be tempting to try and skirt the permit process. In some cities and towns, the cost and hassle of getting a permit can seem unnecessary, especially if you are handy and like to make renovations, or you have a friend who offers to do it for you.

Unfortunately, when you go and try to sell your home, the lack of permits can prove to be a real problem. Buyers may balk at purchasing a home that does not have permits – fearing that the additions may be unsafe or not properly done. In the end, getting the property permits is always a good idea.

Often a home seller will say to me “I’m selling my home do I need permits for work I have done”? Unfortunately, the answer is usually yes you do.

The Temptation Of Avoiding Permits

The temptation to avoid getting a permit for home improvements is something every owner faces at one point or another. It is understandable, as the cost of home...

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Don't let permits and inspections scare you or worry you. I remember this was a big mental hurdle in my mind to getting started. The words alone seem so daunting. Do you have permits for your basement? Did you pass inspection? Crap! What happens if I don't? Jail time? Huge fines?

Chillax. There are no fines and you won't do time. Try changing the vocabulary from" permits" and "inspections" to "announcements" and "reviews". The permit is really just an announcement that you are going to do some work on your house. The inspection is really just a review of your work by a licensed and experienced person who is just checking to make sure everything is safe.

Permits for finishing your basement

If you're finishing your basement yourself you can actually start without one. I built a couple of my walls before I made it official and purchased my "announcement" (permit). I don't even have permits as one of my 8 steps to how to finish a basement.

Now, if you're...

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Why are building permits required for home improvements? When are they needed? How can property owners best navigate the quirks of the permitting process?

Building permits often rank right down there with doing your taxes, or going to the dentist. They are also just as important.

It is essential for homeowners to understand the need for permits, when they are needed, and the penalties of trying to make changes to a property without approval. Here’s what you need to know…

Why You Need to Get a Building Permit for Home Addition, Remodeling, or a Major Improvement Project:

“Earthquakes don’t kill people, buildings do.” – FEMA

The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) opens its introduction to building codes with the above quote.

While there are many different causes of real estate related injuries; codes are designed to keep people safe.

Some may argue that they help generate local government revenues, and protect the most...

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In This Article
What Do Architects Do?
Fees and Options
A La Carte Services
Builders & Architects
Legal Issues
Finding the Right Architect
Questions to Ask
Pros & Cons
Hiring Recommendations View all articles on YOUR BUILDING TEAM

Should you hire an architect for your upcoming project? And what exactly should you hire them to do? To answer these questions, you need to understand the range of services architects provide and which might make financial sense for you.

Before I got involved in the building trades, I assumed that most houses were designed by architects. I quickly realized that this was not the case. In fact, a very small percentage of houses, just 1 or 2 percent, are designed by architects – and a relatively small number of architects are “residential architects,” who specialize in designing homes (vs. commercial and institutional buildings).

Another misconception is that when you hire an architect to...

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What is a Home Inspection?

A home inspection is a thorough and systematic evaluation of the condition of a residential property. It is a complete physical exam of the general integrity, functionality, and overall safety of a home and its various components. The purpose of this process is to ensure that home buyers know exactly what is being purchased, prior to completing the transaction.

In the course of a home inspection, the inspector will evaluate the foundation, framing, roofing, site drainage, attic, plumbing, heating, electrical system, fireplaces, chimneys, pavement, fences, stairs, decks, patios, doors, windows, walls, ceilings, floors, built-in appliances, and numerous other fixtures and components.

In all homes, even brand new ones, some building defects will inevitably be discovered during the inspection. All pertinent findings will be detailed in a written report for the buyer's reference and review, and the inspector will make a complete verbal...

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Shadowlands Haunted Places Index - New York


In New York


Warning
Any places listed in the Haunted Places requires permission to visit or investigate. Many of the places are patrolled by the authorities, trespassers will be prosecuted.

Adirondack Mountains - Big Moose lake - This was featured on unsolved mysteries and is the topic of books, and a movie called a place in the sun. In the early 1900s Grace Brown was drowned by her fiance, Chester Gilette. She haunts a cabin. Reports say that they have tried to pull the string on a light and they feel a cold hand, see her drowning, or see apparitions at the lake..

Albany - Cherry Hill - an unidentified ghost has been seen on the lower floors and terrace.

Albany - Education Building - In the basement there is an elevator that leads to the sub-basement. The sub-basement goes down another four floors and is nicknamed "the dungeon". It was said that when workers were laying...

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This is probably the most common question I get, “Where can you park a tiny house?”. I have no idea why I haven’t just done a post on this, I’ve answered it individually at least 300 times… So, here is the answer:

You can park it almost anywhere it will fit for at least a little while (ha! not helpful, huh? :)). Parking and living in a tiny house… Legally… very few places (so far). The answer to this is pretty much ‘parts of Portland’ as an accessory dwelling unit to another structure only. I have heard from Portland folks though that this is even a blurry line, some say it’s still taboo some say they live tiny and have gone through the process of making their tiny ‘legal’.

Where to live is the one major sticking point (understandably) that prevents a lot of people from choosing tiny. It is a big investment to take for limited security. This is the ‘grey area’ that you hear a lot of tiny housers having to make themselves comfortable with in order to live the...

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